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Hiroshi Kashiwagi

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
After opening to generally negative reviews, director Robert Ito's production of Hiroshi Kashiwagi's play about life in a Japanese-American internment camp, "Laughter and False Teeth," has received the biggest pan of all--from the playwright. Kashiwagi wrote a letter that appeared in the Feb.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
After opening to generally negative reviews, director Robert Ito's production of Hiroshi Kashiwagi's play about life in a Japanese-American internment camp, "Laughter and False Teeth," has received the biggest pan of all--from the playwright. Kashiwagi wrote a letter that appeared in the Feb.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON
Pssst . . . have you heard the latest? Cold Tofu, the Asian-American improvisational group, is staging a full-length, scripted play at Los Angeles Theatre Center. It's called "The Grapevine" and it's by Soji Kashiwagi, whose fabulous actor father, Hiroshi Kashiwagi, has a role in it. And that good-looking kid, what'shisname? From "Karate Kid II"? Yuji Okumoto! He's in it, too. So is Denice Kumagai--you know, the one from "Night Court." What's it about?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar.
For sheer number of plays in a single space, nothing beats Theatre West Works, a seven-week, nine-play series bowing this weekend at Studio City's Theatre West. Developed in company workshops, the eight original plays and one revival include: Marion Gallo's "The Gift" (today only), a dark comedy about two Italian-American brothers, set against a backdrop of child abuse.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decrying Japan's "cult of exclusivity," civil rights activist Jesse Jackson declared Wednesday that he aims to expand a U.S. boycott against Mitsubishi Motors Corp. after he failed to win commitments from the firm to settle charges of sexual harassment and racial discrimination involving its American subsidiaries. Jackson, visibly frustrated after a day of meetings with Japanese auto firms, also announced that Honda Motor Co. will be the next boycott target.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Frank Wedekind's 1890 "Spring Awakening" (newly translated by Rick Foster) kicks off " Jugendstil Fest: Young Moderns of 1900," an inter-disciplinary tribute--by the Odyssey Theatre, Pipeline and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art--to Germany's turn-of-the-century art movement. "It's a major play by a major playwright," said Michael Arabian, whose staging (featuring a 19-member multiracial cast, aged 16-26) opens Saturday at the Odyssey.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Mother/son Angst is at the core of William Inge's "Natural Affection," which opened this weekend in a revival at the Zephyr Theatre. Inge wrote the play in 1960; it was produced on Broadway in 1963, with Kim Hunter and Harry Guardino, directed by Tony Richardson. "At the time, it really wasn't as successful as his other work," said Lorenzo DeStefano, who staged a short run of the show at Theatre 40 last March and reprises those duties here.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan may battle efforts to bring in more things American--everything from computer chips and automobile parts to beef and fresh fruit. But when it came to dealing with what critics call a crushing social problem here involving this nation's biggest companies, some Japanese women played a surprising gambit: They turned to a U.S. import.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1989 | RAY LOYND
"Tis Pity She's a Whore,' John Ford's Jacobean tragedy of incest, revenge and blasted souls, is rarely staged, with good reason. Its excesses are relentless. But a new company, Theatre on the Edge, has reshaped the drama into a rock musical at the Olio Theatre that is notable for its brash fury. Director Robert A. Prior's adaptation takes the bloody text by Ford (1586-1640), and unleashes it into an orbit full of amusing anachronisms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
If quite a bit of theater found its way onto radio in 1988 (particularly through the joint auspices of KCRW-FM and L.A. Classic Theatre), radio as medium and subject matter will raise a couple of stage curtains in 1989. Traditionally, Stage Watch sweeps into the new year by taking a look at some of the more promising and/or offbeat offerings coming to smaller theaters. There seems to be no shortage of such items, in spite of the Waiver Wars of '88. Life in the trenches goes on.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four decades, outsiders paid little attention to tiny Utoro, a ramshackle village near the ancient Japanese capital of Kyoto. Now its residents--survivors, spouses and descendants of a group of Korean laborers conscripted during World War II--hope to gain the world's help in fending off an attempt to evict them. Utoro's 380 villagers have pooled their life savings to publicize their plight. They acknowledge that they have no legal title to the land, which was sold to a developer in 1987.
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