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Hiroshi Okuda

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BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp. announced a shake-up Thursday in the top tiers of management, replacing ailing President Tatsuro Toyoda with Executive Vice President Hiroshi Okuda. The move will put Japan's largest auto maker in the hands of a non-member of the Toyoda family for the first time in nearly three decades. Toyoda's declining health was seen as the main reason behind the shake-up, which had been expected for some time.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp. announced a shake-up Thursday in the top tiers of management, replacing ailing President Tatsuro Toyoda with Executive Vice President Hiroshi Okuda. The move will put Japan's largest auto maker in the hands of a non-member of the Toyoda family for the first time in nearly three decades. Toyoda's declining health was seen as the main reason behind the shake-up, which had been expected for some time.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp. announced a major executive reshuffling aimed at helping the leading Japanese auto maker navigate drastic changes in the global auto industry. Fujio Cho, an executive who ran Toyota's U.S. production arm for six years, was named president of the company, succeeding Hiroshi Okuda. Okuda will remain as chairman, a post similar to chief executive in the U.S. Okuda said Cho is well-suited to lead Toyota during these "turbulent times" of consolidation in the industry.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2005 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
The chairman of Toyota Motor Corp. repeated his statement that the automaker is likely to raise its vehicle prices in the United States to support struggling U.S. carmakers, Kyodo News reported. If the U.S. auto industry collapses, it may adversely affect Japan-U.S. relations by stirring up national sentiment there, Hiroshi Okuda said at a news conference. Okuda was speaking as chairman of the Japan Business Federation, the nation's most powerful business lobby.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Japanese business confidence rose for a second quarter to its best in a year amid gathering signs that government efforts to crank the economy to life are meeting with success. The Bank of Japan's quarterly tankan index showed fewer companies were pessimistic than three months ago. The widely watched index of large manufacturers' sentiment registered minus 37 in June, an improvement over minus 47 in March. Economists had expected an index reading of minus 36.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | From Associated Press
The head of Honda Motor Co. said Thursday his firm aimed to keep production levels high in the United States and purchase more parts in the U.S. to help support the U.S. economy and its floundering auto industry. Honda Chief Executive Takeo Fukui said such measures were preferable to raising prices on Japanese cars. Honda currently produces about 80% of its vehicles for the American market in the U.S. and buys many auto parts needed for its U.S.-market cars from local suppliers, Fukui said.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2005 | From Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp.'s chairman suggested Monday that the Japanese automaker might consider raising the prices of the vehicles it sells in the United States because of the troubles of its ailing U.S. peers, Kyodo News reported. The head of the Japanese business lobby Keidanren, Hiroshi Okuda, who also is Toyota's chairman, suggested the possibility of price increases in the United States after U.S. auto manufacturers General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2002 | From Associated Press and Bloomberg News
Japan's best-known stock market gauge tumbled to 19-year lows for the second day in a row Thursday amid mounting pessimism about the economy's ability to make a quick comeback. The 225-issue Nikkei index lost 135.13 points, or 1.6%, to 8,303.39. It was the lowest close since March 25, 1983. At midday today, the Nikkei was rebounding, up 1.5% to 8,433. The sagging Tokyo market has become a focus of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's economic comeback plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997
Imagine the fortune in being the first in the world to develop practical, affordable vehicles powered by clean technology. Auto makers are becoming aware of the enormous payoff potential and working harder to develop alternatives to internal combustion engines. Ford Motor Co., together with Germany's Daimler-Benz and a small Canadian manufacturer, has now placed a huge bet on fuel cell technology.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2000 | MICHAEL ELLIS, REUTERS
Ford Motor Co., the No. 2 auto maker, said Thursday it held high-level talks with Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. about forming a partnership or alliance to cut costs. "Everyone is talking these days as companies continue to seek partnerships to cut costs and explore possible strategic alliances," Ford spokesman Paul Wood said. "We cannot disclose the details of these talks. We're not going to deny that [Ford Chief Executive] Jacques Nasser and [Toyota Chairman Hiroshi] Okuda have met," Wood added.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Toyota Motor Corp., the world's biggest automaker by market value, named Katsuaki Watanabe as its next president and promoted Akio Toyoda, a grandson of the founder, to a post that lines him up to run the company one day. Watanabe, 62, an executive vice president, oversaw a cost reduction program that put the carmaker on course to a fifth consecutive year of record profit.
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