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Hiroshi Teshigahara

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara, best known overseas for his groundbreaking film "Women in the Dunes" and as the first Asian director nominated for an Academy Award, died Saturday of leukemia at a Tokyo hospital. He was 74. The 1964 release of "Woman in the Dunes," which drew on the surrealist films of Luis Bunuel and his own ideas about existentialism, earned Teshigahara worldwide acclaim. In addition to the Oscar nomination, he won the Special Jury Award at Cannes for the film.
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NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By David Hay
It is a highly choreographed, unabashed spectacle, a contribution to the world of contemporary performance art from a most unexpected place: ikebana , the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. Backed with Broadway lighting and a large supporting cast, ikebana master Akane Teshigahara is promising to turn a once-intimate art into an onstage extravaganza titled “Iemoto Ikebana Live” on April 27, transforming the stage of the Aratani/Japan America Theatre in Los Angeles into the world's largest and most spectacular vase.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | Kevin Thomas, Thomas is a Times staff writer
Twenty-five years ago Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara achieved international renown with "Woman in the Dunes," an eerie, boldly sensual fable in which an entomologist is lured by a woman into a sand pit only to have to shovel endlessly to keep from becoming engulfed by the sand. It won a special jury prize at Cannes, yet Teshigahara has made only a few films since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara, best known overseas for his groundbreaking film "Women in the Dunes" and as the first Asian director nominated for an Academy Award, died Saturday of leukemia at a Tokyo hospital. He was 74. The 1964 release of "Woman in the Dunes," which drew on the surrealist films of Luis Bunuel and his own ideas about existentialism, earned Teshigahara worldwide acclaim. In addition to the Oscar nomination, he won the Special Jury Award at Cannes for the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beach lovers beware. "Woman in the Dunes"--being shown at UC Irvine tonight as the campus film society's "Love and Madness" series continues--can squash any thoughts of idyllic days spent lying on gentle sand. In Hiroshi Teshigahara's existential classic, sand is a relentless enemy that makes life miserable. Talk about a bad day at the shore--an unassuming entomologist (Eiji Okada) visits the beach to study insects and ends up trapped in a pit with a strange woman (Kyoko Kishida).
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By David Hay
It is a highly choreographed, unabashed spectacle, a contribution to the world of contemporary performance art from a most unexpected place: ikebana , the Japanese tradition of flower arranging. Backed with Broadway lighting and a large supporting cast, ikebana master Akane Teshigahara is promising to turn a once-intimate art into an onstage extravaganza titled “Iemoto Ikebana Live” on April 27, transforming the stage of the Aratani/Japan America Theatre in Los Angeles into the world's largest and most spectacular vase.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Teshigahara Tribute Hits Snag: The L.A. Festival may have run into snags for its scheduled Sept. 3 and 4 screenings of Hiroshi Teshigahara's new film, "Rikyu," which has been billed as the director's "triumphant return to filmmaking" after an absence of 17 years. An L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1999
SEPTEMBER Sept. 19-Oct. 21: "Mad About the Boy: Noel Coward on Television," Museum of Television & Radio. Sept. 25-Nov. 7: "An Homage to Hiroshi Teshigahara: New Work by Joanne Julian," Pacific Asia Museum. OCTOBER Oct. 2-Nov. 14: "Faces of Time: 75 Years of Time Magazine Cover Portraits," Ronald Reagan Library. Oct. 4-Jan. 23: "Discovering Dinosaurs," Children's Museum at La Habra. Oct. 9-Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS
More than 100 films and video programs representing 25 cultures of the Pacific continue as part of Los Angeles Festival, through Sept. 16. Today's highlights: Rikyu Japan Today, 8 p.m., Warner Grand Theatre, 478 West 6th St., San Pedro; Monday at 8 p.m., Little Tokyo Cinema, 333 S. Alameda St.; Sept. 10 at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is impossible to watch Hiroshi Teshigahara's superb "Rikyu" ( the Nuart) without a sense of watching history repeating itself. Some 60 years before the events of this film took place, Sir Thomas More, England's Lord Chancellor, found himself--a staunch Catholic and man of conscience--unable to swear to the Act of Supremacy that would grant King Henry VIII authority over the English church, thus permitting him to divorce.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beach lovers beware. "Woman in the Dunes"--being shown at UC Irvine tonight as the campus film society's "Love and Madness" series continues--can squash any thoughts of idyllic days spent lying on gentle sand. In Hiroshi Teshigahara's existential classic, sand is a relentless enemy that makes life miserable. Talk about a bad day at the shore--an unassuming entomologist (Eiji Okada) visits the beach to study insects and ends up trapped in a pit with a strange woman (Kyoko Kishida).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | Kevin Thomas, Thomas is a Times staff writer
Twenty-five years ago Japanese director Hiroshi Teshigahara achieved international renown with "Woman in the Dunes," an eerie, boldly sensual fable in which an entomologist is lured by a woman into a sand pit only to have to shovel endlessly to keep from becoming engulfed by the sand. It won a special jury prize at Cannes, yet Teshigahara has made only a few films since.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiroshi Teshigahara's highly acclaimed, Oscar-nominated 1964 "Woman in the Dunes" remains a masterpiece, a timeless contemplation of life's essential mystery and a triumph of bold, innovative style. In adapting his own novel for the screen, the late Kobo Abe provided Teshigahara with a metaphor for the human condition endlessly rich in implications. In the film's first few moments, the camera picks up a handsome man, Jumpei Niki (the late Eiji Okada), in his late 30s.
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