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Hiroshima Out Of The Ashes Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As television drama goes, a film about the destruction of Hiroshima in 1945 has got to be one of the trickier propositions: How many people would pick such a subject for their viewing pleasure? How "Americanized" would this "Japanese" story have to be to please U.S. tastes? Would companies buy time on the program to sell cars and breakfast cereals? Undaunted by these questions, NBC made the film anyway and will air "Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes" at 9 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1990 | KAZ SUYEISHA, AS TOLD TO SHARON BERNSTEIN
Kaz Suyeisha, below, was an 18-year-old resident of Hiroshima when the atomic bomb was dropped. She is a former president of the Southern California chapter of the Committee for Atomic Bomb Survivors, and served as technical consultant on the film, "Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes," which airs on KNBC Channel 4 tonight at 9. I am hibakusha. That means atomic bomb survivor. I am 63 years old. I used to try to forget about my own experience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1990 | KAZ SUYEISHA, AS TOLD TO SHARON BERNSTEIN
Kaz Suyeisha, below, was an 18-year-old resident of Hiroshima when the atomic bomb was dropped. She is a former president of the Southern California chapter of the Committee for Atomic Bomb Survivors, and served as technical consultant on the film, "Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes," which airs on KNBC Channel 4 tonight at 9. I am hibakusha. That means atomic bomb survivor. I am 63 years old. I used to try to forget about my own experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As television drama goes, a film about the destruction of Hiroshima in 1945 has got to be one of the trickier propositions: How many people would pick such a subject for their viewing pleasure? How "Americanized" would this "Japanese" story have to be to please U.S. tastes? Would companies buy time on the program to sell cars and breakfast cereals? Undaunted by these questions, NBC made the film anyway and will air "Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes" at 9 p.m.
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