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Hirotada Ototake

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July 19, 1999 | MICHAEL YUE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hirotada Ototake's mother was allowed to see her newborn for the first time, a full month after his birth, she let out a happy squeal. "How cute he is!" That wasn't the reaction her doctors had expected--the child was born without arms or legs. The boy is now a college senior, and his autobiography, "No One's Perfect," has become the third-best-selling book in Japan since World War II. The book's many fans say it has fundamentally changed Japanese attitudes toward the disabled.
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NEWS
July 19, 1999 | MICHAEL YUE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hirotada Ototake's mother was allowed to see her newborn for the first time, a full month after his birth, she let out a happy squeal. "How cute he is!" That wasn't the reaction her doctors had expected--the child was born without arms or legs. The boy is now a college senior, and his autobiography, "No One's Perfect," has become the third-best-selling book in Japan since World War II. The book's many fans say it has fundamentally changed Japanese attitudes toward the disabled.
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NEWS
August 22, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it literature, or pornography dressed up as cherry-blossom art? Is it a mature, modern interpretation of a classic Japanese lovers' tale, or a stereotype-laden tour of the dark side of sexual passion? American readers will be able to decide for themselves this month when "A Lost Paradise," an English translation of the controversial Japanese blockbuster "Shitsurakuen," hits U.S. bookstores, one of the few Japanese titles to make it across the Pacific this summer.
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