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Hisham Kabbani

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NEWS
April 15, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In velvet-tipped turban and long, flowing robes, Shaykh Hisham Kabbani goes where few immigrant Muslim leaders have dared go before: the Southland's meanest streets. There, he comforts gangbangers who have seen their mothers shot dead, feeds the poor, and moves scores to declare their faith in Allah. Kabbani does what few Islamic clerics have dared do before: outspokenly challenge the religious practices of Muslim America's established leadership.
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NEWS
April 15, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In velvet-tipped turban and long, flowing robes, Shaykh Hisham Kabbani goes where few immigrant Muslim leaders have dared go before: the Southland's meanest streets. There, he comforts gangbangers who have seen their mothers shot dead, feeds the poor, and moves scores to declare their faith in Allah. Kabbani does what few Islamic clerics have dared do before: outspokenly challenge the religious practices of Muslim America's established leadership.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Acknowledging that Islamic believers have been splintered by sometimes daunting differences over the tenets of their faith, thousands of Muslims convened Friday in Los Angeles for an unprecedented international unity conference. The conference, which closes Sunday, comes at a time when second- and third-generation Muslims in the United States are increasingly entering the American mainstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1999 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In an era in which ethnic conflicts and religious animosities break out with disturbing regularity, Robert Seiple might be called America's foot soldier on the front lines of the holy wars. Five weeks ago, he became America's first ambassador at large for international religious freedom, a post created by the International Religious Freedom Act, which Congress passed in October in the hope of making the battle against religious persecution a more important part of U.S. foreign policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
He is so revered that 1,400 years after his revelation from God, Muslims worldwide still strive to imitate even the smallest details of the prophet Muhammad's life: eating dates, for instance, or using their right hand. His life has inspired an entire branch of Islamic science known as hadith, in which more than 50,000 accounts of his words and deeds have been categorized, classified, endlessly analyzed and used as the model for Muslim behavior.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The diverse reactions to the politics of penitence now playing out across the country, as President Clinton scrambles to control the legal and political fallout from his relationship with Monica S. Lewinsky, illustrate the sometimes radically different ways in which faiths grapple with the age-old issues of wrongdoing, repentance and redemption.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Commercial air travel for Arab Americans has become, at best, an awkward, uncomfortable proposition. Travelers wearing turbans say they are followed by hard, suspicious stares as they move through terminals, and even those in business attire feel a sense of being measured as potential sources of menace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few took notice last year when Muzammil Siddiqi, a Muslim leader of national renown, criticized U.S. support of Israel at a protest rally. But when his comments resurfaced in a newspaper article after the Sept. 11 attacks, they sounded inappropriate, angry--even anti-American. "America has to learn," Siddiqi was quoted as proclaiming to a crowd of cheering Muslims outside the White House. "If you remain on the side of injustice, the wrath of God will come."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | ERIC SLATER and STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
OK, here goes: In a surprise appearance at El Camino College on Monday, O.J. Simpson did not talk about the murder of his ex-wife. He did not discuss his glove size. He did not chat about his Bronco ride, his blood type, or the upcoming trial in civil court. And he did not repeat his forceful avowals that he could not, would not and did not kill Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman. There. That ought to take care of the news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | ERIC SLATER and STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
OK, here goes: In a surprise appearance at El Camino College on Monday, O.J. Simpson did not talk about the murder of his ex-wife. He did not discuss his glove size. He did not chat about his Bronco ride, his blood type, or the upcoming trial in civil court. And he did not repeat his forceful avowals that he could not, would not and did not kill Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman. There. That ought to take care of the news. Or at least, the news that Simpson's supporters fully expect to see in this morning's paper.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Omaima Bukhari is a precocious Muslim in Maryland. She's 20, fascinated by Islam, computer science and psychology. She discusses everything with her father, Zahid, who works at Georgetown University and counts as friends imams and sheiks from Al Azhar, the prestigious seat of Islamic learning in Cairo. Last December, she attended an engagement party for relatives in Pakistan. The bride-to-be was sobbing in the next room.
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