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OPINION
November 24, 1985
Del Olmo objects to the use of the word Hispanic, and I am just as annoyed by the word he prefers: Latino. Writing in an English-language newspaper, he quite properly refers to Mejicanos as Mexicans and Cubanos as Cubans, so why should Latins become Latinos? HUGH A. BURR San Diego
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Think of a map of North America, and then turn it upside down so that Mexico and Texas are at the top and near the middle, and New England drips down like an appendage, nearly falling off the edge at the bottom. Felipe Fernández-Armesto has done something like that with North American history in his fascinating but problem-plagued new book "Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States. " He tells the history of the territory that is now known as the U.S.A. from the point of view of Spanish speakers, going back more than five centuries to the days of the conquistadors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court on Thursday reversed the marijuana-smuggling convictions of two Hispanic men because a federal prosecutor used his challenges to remove the only Hispanic in the jury pool. Ruling on the 1987 case, a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the defendants had established a "case of purposeful discrimination" and that the prosecutor had not offered an adequate explanation of his use of challenges to exclude Hispanics. The case was sent back to U.S. District Judge Gordon B. Thompson Jr. for retrial, but the defense attorney who handled the case said a new trial is unlikely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
The assignment seemed perfect for me. I was a Mexican American college student in Washington and was asked to get cosponsors for a bill that would create a month-long observance honoring the achievements of Latinos - National Hispanic Heritage Month. I had already spent five months as an intern for Democrat Jaime B. Fuster, Puerto Rico's delegate to Congress. Through connections, I lined up a second internship with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. It was May 1988 and an exciting time to be in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2001
Lorenza Munoz's article concerning interracial dating featured in the movie "Save the Last Dance" lacks courage ("The Delicate Dance of an Interracial Love Story," Jan. 12). Munoz says that "because of the potential for controversy, race and class are dicey issues for studios." This is true only when the man is black and the woman is white. If the guy is white and the women are either black, Hispanic or Asian, movie studios don't have any problem showing interracial relationships. The attitude of studio executives is that white men are entitled to date women of all colors, but black, Hispanic and Asian men are not entitled to date white women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1996
My job as a mentor and positive influence for first-graders at O'Melveny Elementary School in San Fernando remains one of the more significant roles I assume. But I am not Hispanic, and the article "On the Lookout for Mentors" (Aug. 13) made it seem impossible for a non-Latino teacher to motivate students. There are always exceptions, and even though I am Caucasian, I like to think that my goal of becoming a teacher at a predominantly Hispanic school is still worthy of pursuing. If we want to help these students, teachers should be sought not for their ethnicity or common background, but because they care about the students.
OPINION
September 3, 1989
I agree with the Op-Ed article "Latinos Should Take The Power" (Aug. 14, by Richard Martinez and Antonio Gonzales) and we should really go ahead and do it. I am just plain sick and tired of politicians like Supervisor Mike Antonovich and the Los Angeles City Council, who have done their best to negate any plan to give adequate and fair Latino representation in the past. Two of the councilmanic posts that should be Hispanic are the 7th and 9th districts. Both incumbents are almost 80 and 90 years old. Their districts are now majority Hispanic or fast approaching this level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996
Re "Thousands of Latinos March in Washington," Oct. 13: As a Hispanic/Latino American (correction, as an American of Hispanic descent), I want to apologize to the other 255 million Americans who witnessed the outrageous display of blind pride, disunity and sickening flag-waving nationalism in our nation's capital. We (Americans) are sure that your home countries will welcome each and every one of you back, with open arms and a hero's parade down the Plaza de la Libertad, Revolucion, Simon Bolivar, Che Guevara, Kennedy, etc., etc., etc. "America, love it or leave it."
MAGAZINE
February 23, 1992
I must take exception to a portion of the profile of Mayor Bradley that claims he has neglected the Hispanic community. Whether the issue is encouraging many of the city's residents from El Salvador to apply for protected legal status, hiring Hispanic staff members who move on to other leadership roles in the region, or appointing commissioners, Mayor Bradley has served as a strong, dynamic role model for many of us. He is a mayor for all the people...
OPINION
April 9, 2000
I just completed the 2000 census short form. Question 7 asks if I am Spanish/Hispanic/Latino. Spain has Spanish people, so that's easy, but what are Hispanics and Latinos? My father was born in Veracruz, Mexico. His father was a Basque who emigrated from Bilbao. My mother was born in South Dakota. Her father was of English ancestry whose forebears came to this country in the 1630s and her mother was born in this country of recent Dutch immigrants. With this background, how do I answer the Spanish/Hispanic/Latino question?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The National Hispanic Media Coalition issued an open letter Tuesday to the members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences expressing their unhappiness that the late "Real Women Have Curves" actress Lupe Ontiveros was not included in the telecast's "In Memoriam" segment. Ontiveros died in July. She was 69. The letter explains that Ontiveros was not a member of the academy, which was the reason for her omission, but it adds that the actress, sponsored by actors Miguel Sandoval and Edward James Olmos, was denied membership in the organization when she applied.  IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: Oscars 2013:   Winner list   |   Red carpet   |   Highlights "It is astonishing that an actress of Ontiveros' caliber and experience was denied membership to the Academy," said the letter.
OPINION
September 22, 2012 | By Tamar Jacoby
Polls show President Obama way ahead with Latinos, the nation's fastest-growing voting bloc. According to the latest Gallup figures, he leads Mitt Romney by 66% to 26% among registered Latinos, who could be the voters who make the difference in November in four of the eight must-win battleground states: Colorado, Nevada, Florida and Virginia. So did Romney help himself this week by giving a major speech to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Los Angeles and participating in a forum on the Spanish-language Univision network?
NATIONAL
September 17, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Cancer is now the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the United States, surpassing deaths due to heart disease, researchers reported Monday. The development is expected to eventually be seen in society overall. Heart disease has been the leading cause of death among Hispanics for decades, but because heart disease deaths have been falling more quickly than cancer deaths among Hispanics, experts had expected cancer deaths to ultimately outpace heart disease deaths, said Rebecca Siegel, an epidemiologist with the American Cancer Society, in a telephone interview Monday.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Researchers have called it the “Hispanic paradox”: When it comes to breast cancer, prostate cancer and heart disease, Latino patients in the U.S. survive longer after diagnosis than their non-Latino white and black counterparts  - even though studies have found they tend to have fewer resources and less access to care than non-Latino whites. It's the same for lung cancer, said scientists at the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami in a paper published online Monday by the journal Cancer .  Querying a vast database that tracks U.S. cancer cases, the researchers looked at 172,398 patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer, a common subtype of the disease, in the U.S. from 1988 to 2007.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel and Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
Net migration from Mexico to the United States has come to a statistical standstill, stalling one of the most significant demographic trends of the last four decades. Amid an economic downturn and increased enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border, the number of Mexicans coming to the United States dropped significantly, while the number of those returning home increased sharply over the last several years, according to a report by the Pew Hispanic Center. "The largest wave of immigration in history from a single country to the United States has come to a standstill," the report says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in the suburbs of Detroit, Helen Iris Torres responded to questions about her identity by telling people she was Puerto Rican. It didn't matter that schoolbooks referred to her as Hispanic. Now, as head of an organization that supports women of Latin American heritage, Torres still says she's a "proud Puerto Rican" but prefers the term Latina, which she says encompasses the larger community of Spanish speakers in the country. Torres' quandary is reflected in a new report by the Pew Hispanic Center, which suggests that the majority of people of Latin American descent choose to identify themselves by their countries of origin, over either Latino or Hispanic.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
New Mexico was planning to celebrate its statehood centennial by inviting tourists to come experience the state's rich culture, take in its extraordinary views and have epic outdoor adventures. But the Land of Enchantment's promotion hit a snag, raising questions about who exactly is being represented in the celebration -- and reviving  historical insecurities. It all started when the New Mexico Department of Tourism began planning  a $2-million marketing campaign to attract outsiders to the state, which  had observed its statehood centennial Jan. 6. The department had learned that the state ranked 38th in a poll ranking tourists' preferred destinations -- and wanted to do something about that.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Hispanic women may be at higher risk of dying from breast cancer compared with white women, a study finds. The study ws presented this week at the Cancer Therapy & Research Center-American Assn. for Cancer Research San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium . Researchers looked at survival rates among 577 Hispanic and white women with invasive breast cancer who were part of the New Mexico Women's Health Study. They discovered that Hispanic women had about a 20% higher risk of dying from breast cancer compared with white women.
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