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Hispanic Owned Business Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Condemning a paucity of post-riot emergency aid, angry Latino immigrant merchants who saw their livelihoods devastated in last year's civil unrest called on government officials Wednesday to reach out to small shop owners and others still struggling to recoup their losses. "We've suffered a lot, and the government has hardly done anything for us," said Juan Zamora, an El Salvadoran shoe salesman whose MacArthur Park-area store was sacked in the riots, costing him $85,000 in inventory.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 1995 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a population of 1.4 million Latinos and an estimated 75,000 Latino-owned businesses--the largest of any city nationwide--Los Angeles would seem the premier business locale for Latinos. Yet, in a recent survey of the top 50 cities for Latino business opportunities, Los Angeles came in at No. 10, ranking behind such cities as Chicago, Phoenix and Albuquerque.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 1995 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a population of 1.4 million Latinos and an estimated 75,000 Latino-owned businesses--the largest of any city nationwide--Los Angeles would seem the premier business locale for Latinos. Yet, in a recent survey of the top 50 cities for Latino business opportunities, Los Angeles came in at No. 10, ranking behind such cities as Chicago, Phoenix and Albuquerque.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1993 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a church on Alvarado Street, two weeks after their small businesses went up in flames last spring, 50 merchants huddled for a strategy session. Their goal: to fight for disaster relief and focus attention on the Latino businesses destroyed in the riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1993 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a church on Alvarado Street, two weeks after their small businesses went up in flames last spring, 50 merchants huddled for a strategy session. Their goal: to fight for disaster relief and focus attention on the Latino businesses destroyed in the riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Condemning a paucity of post-riot emergency aid, angry Latino immigrant merchants who saw their livelihoods devastated in last year's civil unrest called on government officials Wednesday to reach out to small shop owners and others still struggling to recoup their losses. "We've suffered a lot, and the government has hardly done anything for us," said Juan Zamora, an El Salvadoran shoe salesman whose MacArthur Park-area store was sacked in the riots, costing him $85,000 in inventory.
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