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Hispanic Radio Network

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BUSINESS
February 26, 1998 | Daryl Strickland
Next month, the Hispanic Radio Network will set a milestone. The Washington-based network will launch a call-in program broadcast to all Spanish-speaking countries in the Western Hemisphere, except Cuba. Mundo 2000 is a one-hour weekly program about science, technology, health care and the environment.
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BUSINESS
February 26, 1998 | Daryl Strickland
Next month, the Hispanic Radio Network will set a milestone. The Washington-based network will launch a call-in program broadcast to all Spanish-speaking countries in the Western Hemisphere, except Cuba. Mundo 2000 is a one-hour weekly program about science, technology, health care and the environment.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 1994 | Anne Michaud, Times staff writer
Global Identities: Company names are increasingly reflecting the global marketplace. For example, Backer Spielvogel Bates Worldwide Inc. said it will change its name to Bates Worldwide next month to create a "recognizable and consistent global brand." The agency has an Irvine office that handles advertising for Hyundai Motor America. Also, CBS Hispanic Radio Network announced recently that it intends to change its name to CBS Americas.
SPORTS
March 2, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger coach Ron Roenicke used to throw a knuckleball at Mt. San Antonio College, where he was a left-handed pitcher, a species now prized by the Dodgers. But once Roenicke got to UCLA and was moved to the outfield, he never pitched again--in college or in eight major league seasons before his retirement in 1988. Then last fall Roenicke, 36, went to the Dodgers' instructional league as a pitcher to see whether he should pursue a comeback.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
A child is heard wheezing. A Latina mother complains of running to the emergency room in the middle of the night. Then an announcer says President Bush's proposed "Clear Skies" legislation, if enacted, "would create purer air, better health and a more brilliant future in the United States." The Environmental Protection Agency is running the ad on Spanish-language radio stations across the nation as part of a six-week campaign to inform the public about the president's environmental initiatives.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Imagine driving from L.A. to New York without changing the channel on your radio. And imagine pushing a button on the dash to deliver the song you just heard straight to your door. Or choosing from more than 100 specialized channels--from around-the-clock rap to 24-7 adult contemporary. Two companies are each placing a $1-billion bet that radioheads--from music lovers to talk fanatics--will pay for programming that's been free for 80 years.
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