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April 1, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Almaraz, the noted Chicano artist who died of AIDS in December, 1989, is not forgotten in Los Angeles. The artist will be the focus of a solo exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, scheduled for June 18-Aug. 30.
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July 5, 1997 | DINA BASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Macarena was more than just a dance to Felix Sanchez. To the head of the new National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, it's proof that the entertainment industry needs to pay more attention to the Latino community. The dance's popularity--as well as the box-office success of the Mexican film "Like Water for Chocolate"--shows that a cross-section of Americans are interested in Latino-oriented entertainment, which in turn breeds familiarity and positive cultural exchange, Sanchez says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Cesar Gonzales, 18, has seen the graffiti drawings of Jesus and the Aztec symbols on the walls of his neighborhood in East Los Angeles. But viewing "Hispanic Art in the United States," on exhibit at the County Museum of Art, is a different experience for him. "This is my heritage, my background, my people. Just to think that they (some of the artists) had no education, yet they have a brilliance in their art. They express themselves so well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos Almaraz, the noted Chicano artist who died of AIDS in December, 1989, is not forgotten in Los Angeles. The artist will be the focus of a solo exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, scheduled for June 18-Aug. 30.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Third-grader Estevan Ramirez was among 48 finalists in the 1990 McDonald's Hispanic Heritage Art Contest. He attends Alcott Elementary in Pomona. His drawing was titled "The San Diego Mission and Father Serra." The ink-and-colored-pencil drawing will be included in a student art exhibit that will tour the United States. Ramirez's prizes included a savings bond, tickets to Universal Studios and a visit from Ronald McDonald.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997 | DINA BASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Macarena was more than just a dance to Felix Sanchez. To the head of the new National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, it's proof that the entertainment industry needs to pay more attention to the Latino community. The dance's popularity--as well as the box-office success of the Mexican film "Like Water for Chocolate"--shows that a cross-section of Americans are interested in Latino-oriented entertainment, which in turn breeds familiarity and positive cultural exchange, Sanchez says.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto is an art and literary critic and a frequent contributor to Artweek on Latino art. An associate professor at Cal State Northridge, she recently completed an interview with the Mexican painter, Rufino Tamayo
Since the late '60s, Latino art in the United States has gone from the street and public art muralist movements into the mainstream of contemporary American art. As a response to the American political scene of that period and of the decade that followed, the Latino murals of Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego and Los Angeles were didactic and strongly ideological, often depicting the realities of recent political struggles and the need for social justice.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Third-grader Estevan Ramirez was among 48 finalists in the 1990 McDonald's Hispanic Heritage Art Contest. He attends Alcott Elementary in Pomona. His drawing was titled "The San Diego Mission and Father Serra." The ink-and-colored-pencil drawing will be included in a student art exhibit that will tour the United States. Ramirez's prizes included a savings bond, tickets to Universal Studios and a visit from Ronald McDonald.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Cesar Gonzales, 18, has seen the graffiti drawings of Jesus and the Aztec symbols on the walls of his neighborhood in East Los Angeles. But viewing "Hispanic Art in the United States," on exhibit at the County Museum of Art, is a different experience for him. "This is my heritage, my background, my people. Just to think that they (some of the artists) had no education, yet they have a brilliance in their art. They express themselves so well.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto is an art and literary critic and a frequent contributor to Artweek on Latino art. An associate professor at Cal State Northridge, she recently completed an interview with the Mexican painter, Rufino Tamayo
Since the late '60s, Latino art in the United States has gone from the street and public art muralist movements into the mainstream of contemporary American art. As a response to the American political scene of that period and of the decade that followed, the Latino murals of Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego and Los Angeles were didactic and strongly ideological, often depicting the realities of recent political struggles and the need for social justice.
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