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July 25, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're calling it the "party of the people" but it has nothing to do with Ross Perot, the Democratic Party, Bill Clinton's visit to the county Sunday or the presidential election. The event, officially titled "Una Noche del Teatro" and already sold out, is being held tonight at South Coast Repertory. It is expected to raise about $20,000 for two SCR programs: the Hispanic Playwrights Project and the Neighborhood Conservatory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997 | DINA BASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Macarena was more than just a dance to Felix Sanchez. To the head of the new National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, it's proof that the entertainment industry needs to pay more attention to the Latino community. The dance's popularity--as well as the box-office success of the Mexican film "Like Water for Chocolate"--shows that a cross-section of Americans are interested in Latino-oriented entertainment, which in turn breeds familiarity and positive cultural exchange, Sanchez says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most artists would jump for joy upon hearing that they've just been awarded $230,000, but Guillermo Gomez-Pena, a San Diego-based performance artist, received the news that he is one of the 31 fellows announced Tuesday by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation with a sober sense of responsibility. Mexico City-born Gomez-Pena, 35, has long centered his writings and performances around issues of the Mexico-U.S. border.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're calling it the "party of the people" but it has nothing to do with Ross Perot, the Democratic Party, Bill Clinton's visit to the county Sunday or the presidential election. The event, officially titled "Una Noche del Teatro" and already sold out, is being held tonight at South Coast Repertory. It is expected to raise about $20,000 for two SCR programs: the Hispanic Playwrights Project and the Neighborhood Conservatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Cesar Gonzales, 18, has seen the graffiti drawings of Jesus and the Aztec symbols on the walls of his neighborhood in East Los Angeles. But viewing "Hispanic Art in the United States," on exhibit at the County Museum of Art, is a different experience for him. "This is my heritage, my background, my people. Just to think that they (some of the artists) had no education, yet they have a brilliance in their art. They express themselves so well.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Third-grader Estevan Ramirez was among 48 finalists in the 1990 McDonald's Hispanic Heritage Art Contest. He attends Alcott Elementary in Pomona. His drawing was titled "The San Diego Mission and Father Serra." The ink-and-colored-pencil drawing will be included in a student art exhibit that will tour the United States. Ramirez's prizes included a savings bond, tickets to Universal Studios and a visit from Ronald McDonald.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1997 | DINA BASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Macarena was more than just a dance to Felix Sanchez. To the head of the new National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, it's proof that the entertainment industry needs to pay more attention to the Latino community. The dance's popularity--as well as the box-office success of the Mexican film "Like Water for Chocolate"--shows that a cross-section of Americans are interested in Latino-oriented entertainment, which in turn breeds familiarity and positive cultural exchange, Sanchez says.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto is an art and literary critic and a frequent contributor to Artweek on Latino art. An associate professor at Cal State Northridge, she recently completed an interview with the Mexican painter, Rufino Tamayo
Since the late '60s, Latino art in the United States has gone from the street and public art muralist movements into the mainstream of contemporary American art. As a response to the American political scene of that period and of the decade that followed, the Latino murals of Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego and Los Angeles were didactic and strongly ideological, often depicting the realities of recent political struggles and the need for social justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most artists would jump for joy upon hearing that they've just been awarded $230,000, but Guillermo Gomez-Pena, a San Diego-based performance artist, received the news that he is one of the 31 fellows announced Tuesday by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation with a sober sense of responsibility. Mexico City-born Gomez-Pena, 35, has long centered his writings and performances around issues of the Mexico-U.S. border.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Third-grader Estevan Ramirez was among 48 finalists in the 1990 McDonald's Hispanic Heritage Art Contest. He attends Alcott Elementary in Pomona. His drawing was titled "The San Diego Mission and Father Serra." The ink-and-colored-pencil drawing will be included in a student art exhibit that will tour the United States. Ramirez's prizes included a savings bond, tickets to Universal Studios and a visit from Ronald McDonald.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Cesar Gonzales, 18, has seen the graffiti drawings of Jesus and the Aztec symbols on the walls of his neighborhood in East Los Angeles. But viewing "Hispanic Art in the United States," on exhibit at the County Museum of Art, is a different experience for him. "This is my heritage, my background, my people. Just to think that they (some of the artists) had no education, yet they have a brilliance in their art. They express themselves so well.
BOOKS
September 20, 1987 | Margarita Nieto, Nieto is an art and literary critic and a frequent contributor to Artweek on Latino art. An associate professor at Cal State Northridge, she recently completed an interview with the Mexican painter, Rufino Tamayo
Since the late '60s, Latino art in the United States has gone from the street and public art muralist movements into the mainstream of contemporary American art. As a response to the American political scene of that period and of the decade that followed, the Latino murals of Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego and Los Angeles were didactic and strongly ideological, often depicting the realities of recent political struggles and the need for social justice.
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