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NEWS
February 5, 1989 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
In theory, Edwin Markham Intermediate School is neutral ground. Crips territory stretches to the east, past a low, graffiti-slashed wall and the Southern Pacific railroad tracks. Bloods claim the turf to the west. Often they parade by the school on bikes or in cars, waving red bandanas--their "rags." From both sides, more than 1,600 children arrive for class each weekday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
The most remarkable thing about New Mexico's Roy E. Disney Center for the Performing Arts, which opened with a festive inaugural concert here Saturday, is neither its architecture nor its varied first-year program of music, dance and theater. What's so stunning about the venue is its location and its mission. Though it has aspirations for national impact, the new building did not debut in the state capital of Santa Fe, the trendy art mecca for outsiders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
On March 6, 1968, more than 1,000 high school students in East Los Angeles marched out of their classrooms and into the streets, setting off a chain of events they hoped would change their schools forever. So began the East Los Angeles "blowouts," a series of student walkouts to expose substandard education for Latinos in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mention el circo to anyone who grew up in a Latin American country and you are bound to hear nostalgic tales of colorful tents pitched somewhere in the outskirts of a big city, of distorted music blaring from cheap speakers, and of entire families (complete with babies and abuelitos ) watching with awe the exotic animals, grotesque-looking clowns and loud ringmasters en espanol . The circus continues to be an immensely popular attraction in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gang-related violence Sunday during a lowrider car show in Pomona in which one person died and nine others were injured has left the show's promoter shaken and uncertain about the future in Southern California of the Southwest's premiere tour of its kind. Killed in the melee at the Los Angeles County Fairplex was Jose Ramos, 32, of Inglewood. Five of the injured were reported in stable condition Monday at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. The others were treated and released.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | IVAN SCOTT, Ivan Scott is a free - lance writer and broadcast journalist based in Washington
It's 2 p.m. on a Tuesday afternoon. Inside Studio A at Univision's modern production complex, the audience of 400 has just been ushered in. Most are in their 30s or 40s, but there are a few older people and some in their teens and early 20s. All are well-dressed--the men in jackets and ties, the women in suits or dresses. Many have been waiting outside in the sun since early in the morning. They are anxious, expectant. "Having fun? Isn't it great to be here?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991 | NANCY PLEVIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carlos Velez-Ibanez, a former Roman Catholic altar boy and graduate of parochial school, was astounded that day 30 years ago when his only sister died and his mother leaned over to whisper in his ear: "I'm going to tell you a secret that has always been passed on through the women of our family. But now I must tell you. "Somos Judios," she said. We're Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Latino gang members are cholos , but not all cholos are gang members. There is a difference between immigrants and Latinos who were born in the United States. And violence is not a hereditary trait passed down through generations of Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1993 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alicia Rodriguez and Kacee Frayo giggled as the El Torito Danza Mexicana dancers passed by wearing comedic Guanajuato costumes. "They're the funny ones," Alicia, 5, told Kacee, 11, pointing at the dancers who wore traditional colorful masks and frolicked around a man dressed as a bull. The girls were among an estimated 20,000 people lining La Habra Boulevard on Saturday morning, cheering, clapping and waving during the 45th annual Corn Festival Parade.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his wooden desk, Fernando Velo, the 42-year-old editor and publisher of Azteca News, can look out the office window and see signs of the publishing battle going on in downtown Santa Ana. It is here, amid the bustle of Mexicans, Cubans, Guatemalans and other Latino immigrants, that hundreds of stacks of newspapers are dropped off at markets, restaurants and liquor stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The painting, with its dark tones and streetwise style, greets visitors to the Mestizo Visions art exhibit at the Cal State Channel Islands campus. Fillmore artist Chuy Rangel figures it provides the perfect symbol for the show at large, which runs through Oct. 13 and features nearly two dozen Latino artists from Ventura and Los Angeles counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Celguera was bouncing with a friend down the aisle of a row of bookstalls at the Latino Book and Family Festival Saturday feeling very much at home. "This is all talking about our culture, man, and I really like it," said Celguera, 15, who had traveled to the Los Angeles Convention Center with a group of 20 students from the Chicano Club at San Fernando High School. "It's usually really hard to find things we can relate to, but here everything is all under one roof."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after opening its doors, the Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture in downtown Los Angeles is facing serious financial difficulties. It has been operating in the red for at least four months--unable to pay its staff of 12 and some of its creditors. Although the museum will not reveal the exact amount of its debt, employees and others who have come forward say several hundred thousand dollars is owed them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cozkacuauhtli Zenteotl was once known as Eduardo Rivera. For 18 years, he didn't think much about his name until one day he realized that, unlike many of his white and African American classmates, he knew very little about his family's history. "Their roots went back to Europe and Africa," he said. "But me? I did not know how I came about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2000 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cozkacuauhtli Zenteotl was once known as Eduardo Rivera. For 18 years, he didn't think much about his name until one day he realized that, unlike many of his white and African-American classmates, he knew very little about his family's history. "Their roots went back to Europe and Africa," he said. "But me? I did not know how I came about."
BUSINESS
February 16, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey A. Stern and Marcelino Miyares Jr. are helping to script Act 2 of the Latino Internet revolution. In a Westside office cramped with a budding staff, the pair work 14-hour days to build InternetMercado.com, among the first online shopping sites for Latinos. First, a string of portals targeting Latinos in the U.S. and Latin America burst onto the "dot-com" scene, linking viewers with search engines, news and chat groups.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the heavy wooden cross marking the entrance to Olvera Street, the scene repeats itself every few minutes with only minor variations. Visitors first try to sound out what is carved on the dark crossbar: El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de Los Angeles. The City of Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 64 years old and close to retirement, Socorro Venegas has no trouble imagining who will succeed her at the onion factory in tiny King City--where good jobs are kept in the family. Venegas followed her husband to this Salinas Valley town from Mexico City 13 years ago. Three sons in turn followed them to the assembly line at the factory, Basic Vegetable Products.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We are the Picassos of the boulevard. We are the working man's work of art." --Kita Lealao, lowrider. * If the car is the signature of America, then the lowrider could be considered a defining mark of the Mexican American. The car that has swelled the hearts of tough pachucos, prompted serenades by Chicano bands and created an allure for a forbidden ethnic Los Angeles has hit the mainstream.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steven Cortez was dumbfounded. His college counselor--his mentor, a man he considered as much a buddy as a teacher--was suddenly threatening him: If you do this, don't ever talk to me again. Steven had bumped into Eddy Estrada at a Starbucks in Monterey Park one morning last summer. They had been sitting in the sun with their coffees, laughing and chatting, when Estrada asked Steven about the classes he planned to take that fall as a sophomore at East Los Angeles College.
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