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Hispanics Education

NEWS
January 25, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
From enrollment in preschool to attainment of graduate degrees, the nation's Latinos are "grossly under-represented at every rung of the educational ladder" and, by many measures of academic achievement, are losing ground, according to a study by the American Council on Education. The study, released in Washington this week, showed that the proportion of Latino students completing high school slid from 60.1% in 1984 to 55.9% in 1989.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN and JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seven Southern California universities ranked in the top 20 in the nation in awarding bachelor's degrees to Latino students, according to a new survey by a higher education publication. The study, conducted by the New Jersey-based Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education, with help from the U.S. Department of Education, tallied the degrees conferred to Latino graduates in 1993. Using those numbers, the group also ranked academic programs based on the number of Latinos who graduate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994
Ten Orange County high school students will receive $1,000 scholarships at the seventh annual awards luncheon of the Efren Herrera Scholarship Foundation at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Tlaquepaque Restaurant in Placentia. The foundation is a private, nonprofit organization that raises money to aid college-bound Latino students. It was created seven years ago by Herrera, former place-kicker for the Seattle Seahawks and Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League and Manuel A.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bettina Flores grimaces when she recalls her life as an 8-year-old. She is stooping alongside her widowed mother and six siblings in a field outside Fresno. She is picking grapes--for 2 1/2 cents a tray--and dreaming about living in an air-conditioned home, wearing pretty clothes, playing with a mountain of toys, jingling a pocketful of quarters she will use to buy candy. At 12, Flores moved a step closer to her dreams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos, under fire for remarks he made last spring about Latino parents' attitudes toward education, stuck to his guns Monday as he prepared to open the last of a series of hearings on Latino education. "When there is a failure, we are all responsible, every citizen in this country. . . . That applies to parents as well as teachers, the business community (and others)," Cavazos told a Los Angeles news conference at Huntington Park High School.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Latino advocacy groups welcomed President Bush's recent signing of an executive order aimed at improving the educational achievement of Latinos, they believe that the biggest hurdle is still ahead--getting funds to implement the objectives. Getting the executive order "took two years. It was a long process," said Denise de la Rosa, the education policy analyst for the National Council of La Raza, a Latino civil rights group. "We think it's a good start."
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
During a series of discussions Friday on his life and legacy, four students held an impromptu debate in a hallway on the UC Riverside campus that no doubt would have pleased the school's late chancellor, Tomas Rivera. "How do you refer to yourself?" asked one of the women students. "I am Hispanic," said Linda Ureno, 22. "I'm Chicana, and proud of it," said Carolina Martinez, 21. "I say I am human," said Esther Martinez, 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO and NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan said Tuesday that the head of the school board should "go home and wash her mouth out with soap" for sympathizing with Latino parents who want to oust a Valley school principal because he isn't Latino. Riordan called the comments by board President Victoria Castro, made shortly after the principal said he was beaten unconscious by anti-white assailants, "very inflammatory and indiscreet."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | From Times wire services
Millions of young Latinos are qualified for college but never attend, often becoming stuck in dead-end, low-paying jobs, according to a study released last week. The study by the Educational Testing Service, the firm that produces the SAT, said 22% of Latinos ages 18 to 24 attend college, compared with 32% of the general population of that age group. Closing that gap would produce 430,000 more Latino college students and more than 100,000 more Latino college graduates, the study said.
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