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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single-family home in the heart of a Latino neighborhood here is a haven for those who believe. They are there to see Mina, a slightly built woman with a head of uncontrollable brown hair and wild eyes, who they believe can cure physical ailments, help the lovelorn and bring fortune to lost souls--all in her converted washroom.
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NEWS
August 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Latinos have the nation's highest rate of death from cirrhosis of the liver, according to an analysis by a federal agency that researches alcohol-related problems. "The new [Latino] ethnicity distinction on certificates of death corrects the decades-old belief that black males are at greatest risk of cirrhosis death," said Mary C. Dufour, deputy director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Mendoza knew that the drugs he was selling in his family's East Los Angeles minimarket were not meant to be sold in the United States. But the products, which authorities said ranged from foot creams to antibiotics, were in great demand among his customers. Many of them were illegal immigrants, afraid to return to Mexico, where they would have been able to purchase those pharmaceuticals without a prescription in one of Tijuana's many farmacias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Misinformation and lack of access to health care contribute to elevated diabetes rates among elderly Latinos in Los Angeles County, according to a UCLA study released Tuesday. "A lot of Latinos think that if [they] drink cactus juice, it can prevent diabetes," said Dr. David Hayes-Bautista, director of the UCLA Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, which conducted the study. "We need to make sure they're doing more."
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tacitly acknowledging that Los Angeles County has failed to stem the rapid spread of HIV and AIDS in minority communities, the Board of Supervisors unanimously declared an emergency Tuesday and called on the state and federal governments to pay for expanded medical care and social services. The largely symbolic action followed a series published in The Times that cited the swift spread of HIV and AIDS in the county's African American and Latino communities and the lack of housing services there.
NEWS
April 17, 1995
Women who take vitamins with folic acid have a lower risk of having babies with neural tube defects, according to a new California study, which also shows that Latino women may benefit less from folic acid. The findings are of some concern because Latinas have a 50% higher risk than whites or African Americans of having babies with the defects.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | MARILYN YAQUINTO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latinos have poorer access to medical care than other Americans, primarily because they work in lower-paying jobs without the benefit of medical coverage, yet earn too much money to be eligible for most state insurance programs, according to a congressional report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1993 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the time has come for Latinos to become part of the solution to their own problems and to those of the nation, the country's chief physician unveiled recommendations Tuesday that she said would ensure that Latinos help shape any national health care reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | CONSELLA A. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The launching of a health outreach program could make tacrine, a promising new drug, and other innovations in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease more accessible to Latinos in Los Angeles. "We have care givers who are suffering in silence in their homes not knowing that anybody can help them," said Laura Trejo, the program's director. In Los Angeles County, tens of thousands of Latinos suffer from Alzheimer's, said officials who helped launch the outreach program last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1993 | SARA CATANIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 17 years as a diabetes specialist, physician Naomi Neufeld was familiar with a potentially fatal form of the disease that is common in adults. Then, she discovered the adult-type diabetes in a 10-year-old Ventura boy, the first time she had ever heard of a child stricken by the disease that usually develops at age 30 or older. Since that diagnosis two years ago, Neufeld has found more than a dozen Latino children in Ventura County with the adult-onset diabetes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ana Soto put off going to the doctor for several years, fearing she wouldn't be able to pay for the office visit. Then a relative told her she could get a checkup for next to nothing at Valley Community Clinic in North Hollywood. The word-of-mouth referral saved Soto's life. A routine mammogram revealed a lump in her breast, the 49-year-old North Hollywood housewife said, speaking in Spanish through an interpreter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2000
Many of them have been caregivers all their lives, but low-income Latinas are unprepared to care for themselves as they age and face chronic illnesses, according to a survey released Wednesday. The study by Santa Ana-based Latino Health Access surveyed 108 Latinas ages 45 to 64 in one of Orange County's poorest ZIP codes. The results paint a grim picture of some aging Latinas facing medical and financial problems that they are not equipped to handle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2000
The state Department of Health Services on Monday unveiled its latest promotion tool for the state's AIDS prevention campaign: a shiny, red lowrider that will tour the state for the next 15 months, taking the message of AIDS prevention to car shows and other events in hopes of grabbing young people's attention. The campaign is part of the department's efforts to reach out to diverse California populations in the fight against the spread of HIV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 2 days old, Alicia Rodriguez received a blood transfusion that left her system infected with hepatitis C. As she grew up she got sicker and sicker, always expecting to die young. But five years ago, when she was 24, she got a liver from a 17-year-old boy who had died in a car crash. She calls him her angel. Having been saved by the gift of a liver, Rodriguez is now on a mission to encourage organ donations from Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 2 days old, Alicia Rodriguez received a blood transfusion that left her system infected with hepatitis C. As she grew she got sicker and sicker, always expecting to die young. But five years ago she got a new liver from a 17-year-old boy who died in a car crash. She calls him her angel. Having been saved by the gift of a liver, Rodriguez, 28, is now on a mission to encourage organ donations from Latinos.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latino adults in California are more likely to say that they are in poor health than Latinos in most other states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. The study, part of a growing effort to understand health disparities between minorities and whites, is the first to provide state-by-state comparisons.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life expectancy for most Americans remained at a record high and infant mortality reached an all-time low, according to federal figures announced Thursday, but health officials noted that the United States lags behind many other industrialized nations in both areas. Moreover, the life span for black males has shown no improvement during the last half of the 1980s, and, in fact, declined between 1987 and 1988, largely as a result of homicide and the AIDS epidemic, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The health care system in Los Angeles County fails to serve the needs of blacks and Latinos for medical care outside the hospital, according to a new report from two researchers at the UCLA School of Public Health and the RAND Corp. in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Community activists, researchers and students at a symposium Friday at Cal State Northridge addressed the negative health and social effects that alcohol and tobacco have on Latinos. The California Latino Leadership United for Healthy Communities, a statewide coalition of researchers, practitioners, community and civic groups, sponsored the two-day event, which ends today, to raise awareness of the problems and seek solutions.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laura Trejo grew up in Huntington Park--one of several Latino communities in metropolitan Los Angeles in which a study a few years ago asked residents where they would seek help for a loved one with memory problems. The study found that far more often people said they would call information rather than call the family doctor. So when Trejo--who had been working with the elderly--was asked by Los Angeles Alzheimer's Assn.'
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