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NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't drink the water. It's a warning repeated often to anyone growing up in Mexico. So when Maria Hernandez uses tap water in her apartment in Maywood, she knows what to do. She boils it first, just as she did in the Mexican town where she grew up. Buying filtered water is expensive for her struggling family of five children, but the alternative is worse, she said. "And if we die, who's going to bury us?" asked Hernandez outside a store called Agua Aqui that sells purified water.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1988 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
On March 6, 1968, more than 1,000 high school students in East Los Angeles marched out of their classrooms and into the streets, setting off a chain of events they hoped would change their schools forever. So began the East Los Angeles "blowouts," a series of student walkouts to expose substandard education for Latinos in the Los Angeles Unified School District.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came in caravans from as far away as Fresno, Mexicali and Tucson, all to wonder at No. 34, one of their own. "All of a sudden, everyone was cheering for this guy who was a Mexican," recalled Arturo Vargas, a college kid with big dreams in those heady days, remembering the ubiquitous buzz. "Here we had a Mexican--one of us!--who was a hero for all of L.A., not just for us." It has been 20 years since the craze known as Fernandomania shook Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
They emerged from nowhere three years ago, 100 mothers with two things in common: a white scarf tied around their heads and a deep-seated concern for the health and safety of their East Los Angeles neighborhoods. Galvanized by Father John Moretta of Resurrection Church to battle construction of a proposed $100-million state prison in East Los Angeles, the group of Latinas helped stall the project and have gone on to tackle issues ranging from environmental pollution to overcrowded classrooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bert Corona, Pancho Gonzalez, Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta--the names of these Mexican American heroes and others will soon line the walls of the Ruben Salazar Mexican American Hall of Fame at a leading social services agency in Montebello. "It's time to put the light on the unsung heroes of Mexican origin, instead of stressing the gangs and the killings and the border," said Dionicio Morales, 75, who founded the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation 33 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1997 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Telemundo and its Glendale-based flagship station, KVEA-TV Channel 52, will announce a major prime-time programming shake-up next month designed to make the network and its affiliates more competitive with Univision, the dominant force in Spanish-language broadcasting in the United States. Nationally, Telemundo stations will move their local newscasts up an hour to 10 p.m. beginning Aug. 11, positioning them as the earliest nightly Spanish-language news in most markets.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades of operating in separate worlds, black and Latino gangs have begun to clash over turf and drugs, sparking a series of violent interracial battles that authorities say signals an ominous turn in the region's gang warfare. In communities from Venice to Riverside, gangs that once coexisted peacefully--sometimes even allying themselves to fend off outsiders--have become rivals in a power struggle that is linked to racial conflicts inside the jails and prisons, officials say.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1987 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
The competition for Latino readers and advertising dollars in the Southland has heated up with the debut this week of the area's third Spanish-language daily newspaper--El Diario de Los Angeles, which aims to distinguish itself with heavy doses of local news, splashy color photos and a touch of sensationalism. "It's not going to be easy," said El Diario's publisher, Jose Luis Becerra, 55, who also runs a Mexican news agency and who founded a chain of newspapers in Mexico City at age 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1993 | JESSE KATZ and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite a drop in gang warfare, police and government officials said Monday that they are putting little faith in the Mexican Mafia's attempt to impose a "no drive-by shooting" rule on hundreds of Latino street gangs, contending that any reduction in bloodshed will probably be temporary and not necessarily attributable to the prison gang's influence.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2001 | KINNEY LITTLEFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Self-Help Graphics' vibrant inks have left a lasting imprint. For 28 years, the acclaimed nonprofit arts center has been a mecca of fine printmaking in East Los Angeles, a nexus of Chicano pride and artistic endeavor. It will share its wealth with the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art in Santa Ana, when the high-energy exhibition "Inspiring Heroes" opens July 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antonio Villaraigosa's loss in last week's mayoral election overshadowed clear signs that the long-delayed political power of Latino voters continues to expand. Even as supporters bemoaned Villaraigosa's failed bid to become the city's first Latino mayor since 1872, political analysts were seizing on the positives: the overwhelming support he had among Latinos, the group's higher-than-average turnout and the victory of City Atty.-elect Rocky Delgadillo.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR and NANCY CLEELAND and PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
No matter how hard Antonio Villaraigosa tried to downplay his Eastside roots, his campaign took on the air of a crusade among Latinos in Los Angeles in its final days. Latino voters turned out in record numbers Tuesday, reaching another milestone in a decade-long march toward political power, rallying behind a candidate whose life story came to exemplify many of their hopes and dreams.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James K. Hahn, the mild-mannered city attorney and scion of one of the city's most enduring political families, defeated Antonio Villaraigosa on Tuesday in the hard-fought contest to become the next mayor of Los Angeles. The 20-year City Hall veteran won by solidly securing his base in the African American community and drawing strong majorities of moderate and conservative voters--a coalition that continued to prevail despite an unusually large turnout by liberals and Latinos for Villaraigosa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once the Los Angeles mayoral campaign turned into a two-man race, it became conventional wisdom that Antonio Villaraigosa could count on one constant: overwhelming support from a fast-growing Latino electorate that now represents about one in five city voters. Which is why some political analysts were surprised Tuesday when a Los Angeles Times poll showed Villaraigosa garnering only 57% of likely Latino voters--less than exit polls showed him receiving from Latinos in the April election.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one's expecting the masses to rush to the Crenshaw business corridor, the heart of African American commerce in Los Angeles, for churros and chicken tacos. But given the dramatic increase in the Latino population in the area--which stretches roughly from the Santa Monica Freeway to Slauson Avenue along Crenshaw Boulevard--African American and other merchants are adding snacks, signage and Latino staffers to help them fish in a widening revenue stream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1991 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, Lupe Loera of the Pico-Aliso housing projects in Boyle Heights thinks of the Los Angeles police officers in her neighborhood as soldiers of a hostile foreign army who harass good citizens and commit untold acts of brutality. And then, on other days, she wonders why there aren't more officers and patrol cars around to protect defenseless residents from violent drug dealers and the 12 street gangs that prowl the projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1998 | YVETTE C. DOSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Oscar "Zeta" Acosta--an outrageous lawyer who once subpoenaed every member of the Los Angeles County grand jury to prove a pattern of discrimination against Mexican Americans--is somewhat of a Chicano folk legend. He was a driven, hell-raising attorney who was involved in high-profile civil rights cases in Los Angeles in the late 1960s and early '70s and inspired the character of Dr. Gonzo in Hunter S. Thompson's surreal book "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2001 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adolfo Nodal retired three months ago, but these days he's still working. There's one project the former director of the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department can't give up. Nodal and other prominent Cuban Americans want to redesign and expand an aging monument in Echo Park honoring Cuban poet and revolutionary Jose Marti. But fierce, months-long opposition from some neighborhood residents has stalled the project, forcing several design changes and sparking bitterness between the groups.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antonio Villaraigosa pulled support from across lines of class and race in Tuesday's election, marrying substantial support in the Westside and the San Fernando Valley with his base on the Eastside. James K. Hahn won a strong majority of the black vote, and a large share of elderly voters, doing well in areas of the city that were won by other candidates who are now out of the race.
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