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NEWS
August 15, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The wood is beginning to rot. High on a ridge called La Manga, blue stain fungus is appearing in pile after pile of magnificent centuries-old ponderosa, discoloring and devaluing the wood before loggers can sell it and reward a tiny Hispanic community that stood behind them in a bitter battle with white environmentalists. The local woodcutters and their leader, the raffishly handsome Antonio "Ikie" DeVargas, rashly dropped the trees before building a road to get the wood to market.
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NEWS
August 15, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The wood is beginning to rot. High on a ridge called La Manga, blue stain fungus is appearing in pile after pile of magnificent centuries-old ponderosa, discoloring and devaluing the wood before loggers can sell it and reward a tiny Hispanic community that stood behind them in a bitter battle with white environmentalists. The local woodcutters and their leader, the raffishly handsome Antonio "Ikie" DeVargas, rashly dropped the trees before building a road to get the wood to market.
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NEWS
May 17, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To Latinos, he was a gutsy trailblazer who bravely settled a New World. To American Indians, he was a ruthless colonialist who cut off the feet of their ancestors. Now, the city's plans to celebrate the Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate's arrival in New Mexico 400 years ago have hit a snag: The guest of honor isn't welcome by all. A proposal to spend $255,000 in taxpayer money to erect a statue to honor Onate has reopened long-festering wounds between Latinos and American Indians and become a focal point in the dueling versions of New Mexico's history.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To Latinos, he was a gutsy trailblazer who bravely settled a New World. To American Indians, he was a ruthless colonialist who cut off the feet of their ancestors. Now, the city's plans to celebrate the Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate's arrival in New Mexico 400 years ago have hit a snag: The guest of honor isn't welcome by all. A proposal to spend $255,000 in taxpayer money to erect a statue to honor Onate has reopened long-festering wounds between Latinos and American Indians and become a focal point in the dueling versions of New Mexico's history.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contentious, independent and fiercely protective of this city's vanishing Latino culture and traditions, Mayor Debbie Jaramillo is not for those who like their civic leaders warm and fuzzy. Jaramillo, 42, was elected in March on a pledge to reverse trends that in less than a decade had transformed this 384-year-old former Spanish settlement on the southern flanks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains into an enclave for wealthy tourists and transplants.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the back room of a 140-year-old trading post in this mountain hamlet, Johanna Terrazas sits at a creaky loom weaving bright striped blankets out of dyed wool from nearly extinct churro sheep. "You know, the old folks had it right," said Terrazas, 39, admiring the snow-draped pasturelands. "We don't need luxuries. What we need is family, land and a chance to make an honest living."
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John Yslas lost his job in 1943, he headed west from New Mexico, settling with his wife in this desert town where the Santa Fe railroad was offering work. They came the way so many families came from small towns in Arizona and New Mexico: the legendary Route 66. Yslas, now 81, can see that history whenever he surveys the congregation at his largely Latino Catholic church.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Rick Sepulveda can't make up his mind between Barack Obama and John McCain. The 49-year-old beer salesman thinks the Democrat would do a better job with the economy, but he can't stomach Obama's support for abortion, an affront to his faith. "I'm pro-life. That's a big issue for me," Sepulveda said recently, after taking an order at the T&T Supermart here, 18 miles north of Albuquerque. But, he added, "McCain is another Bush."
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle for the Latino vote was supposed to be fought in the barrios and suburbs of Southern California and New York City, and in states such as Illinois and New Jersey. But now, with the clock ticking toward election day, the cries of "Viva Bush" and "Viva Gore" are being heard in only a few, unexpected places.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the back room of a 140-year-old trading post in this mountain hamlet, Johanna Terrazas sits at a creaky loom weaving bright striped blankets out of dyed wool from nearly extinct churro sheep. "You know, the old folks had it right," said Terrazas, 39, admiring the snow-draped pasturelands. "We don't need luxuries. What we need is family, land and a chance to make an honest living."
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contentious, independent and fiercely protective of this city's vanishing Latino culture and traditions, Mayor Debbie Jaramillo is not for those who like their civic leaders warm and fuzzy. Jaramillo, 42, was elected in March on a pledge to reverse trends that in less than a decade had transformed this 384-year-old former Spanish settlement on the southern flanks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains into an enclave for wealthy tourists and transplants.
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