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Hispanics Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | LILY ENG and BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty years ago, Hispanics made up barely 15% of Santa Ana's population. Mostly farm workers and laborers, they were forced to attend "Mexican" schools, not allowed to eat in certain restaurants, and segregated into five barrios. Now, according to U.S. Census figures released Monday, they make up 65% of the population, giving Santa Ana by far the highest percentage of Hispanics of any major California city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Latino activists are criticizing an internal report by the city's police chief that examines their allegations of police misconduct, but also tracks who is doing the complaining. Anaheim Police Chief Roger Baker made the 36-page presentation before a closed session of the City Council last fall, but the activists had not viewed the document until Friday.
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NEWS
September 30, 1990 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"OC Rules" is scratched out and painted over with "Crown Town" along the "Alley of Hell," a back street near Paseo Grande and 6th Street that bears the scars of gang rhetoric. On the alley's walls and fences, Corona's well-established Latino gangs constantly hurl spray-painted insults in a war of words with imperialistic homeboys from Orange County interested in annexing more turf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In new boundary maps unveiled Wednesday, the state Assembly proposed increasing the number of Orange County districts from seven to nine, some of them reflecting the growing local clout of Latinos. The new maps also pull Corona, Norco and part of western Riverside County into a formerly all-Orange County district--and put residents with differing transportation priorities under one representative.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Estella Reynoso remembers the slap. She was in the third grade with other Mexican-American children from a nearby migrant camp and was one of the few who could speak English. "I remember the teacher asking me to read out loud from a book in English. I stumbled on a difficult word and couldn't say it. The teacher got up from her desk, came over to me and slapped me hard in the face," Reynoso said.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | SONNI EFRON and DAVAN MAHARAJ, Times Staff Writers
Thirteen years ago, Robert Rendon's brother was murdered in a gang shooting on Rosita Place in Garden Grove. Last week, around the corner on La Bonita Street, Rendon's 26-year-old son lost a leg in another drive-by shooting. "We're strong people, but this takes a lot out of you," said Rendon, 54, a carpenter who grew up and raised eight sons in the neighborhood, which straddles Westminster Avenue--also called 17th Street--and includes a few blocks of both Santa Ana and Garden Grove.
MAGAZINE
June 17, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, Patt Morrison is a Times staff writer who has covered Orange and L.A. counties.
WHAT IS IT between Los Angeles and Orange counties? Are we not warmed by the same ultraviolet rays, quenched by the same pirated water, ensnared in the same gill net of freeways? Are our differences really any wider than the line on a gerrymanderer's map? Let us put it to scholars, men of enlightenment and reason. Orange County historian Jim Sleeper (with feeling): "I wouldn't go up to Los Angeles to see Jesus Christ rassle a bear."
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | LISA MASCARO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosa pauses in front of the bathroom mirror to study the results of her evening makeup ritual: Bangs, resembling peacock feathers, shoot stylishly three inches above her forehead; frosted lids highlight thickly lined eyes; cheeks have been brushed with a burning rouge hue. This meticulous beauty routine has made her late for the cross-town drive into her gang-member boyfriend's Santa Ana neighborhood. And that will make him angry.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World War II had just ended and the United States had established itself as a leader of freedom and democracy in the Western world--but not for everyone. Gonzalo Mendez and his three children were in the middle of a war at home for a simple freedom--the right for the children to attend school with other Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many Latinos, this day in history is as significant as the Fourth of July and is similar to what St. Patrick's Day is for the Irish--a celebration of heritage. And as Orange County residents Saturday began enjoying the weekend Diez y Seis de Septiembre (16th of September) fiestas, public officials said it was not just a commemoration of Mexico's Independence Day but also recognition of the county's growing Latino community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County supervisors adopted new boundaries Tuesday that keep Santa Ana--the county's largest city, with the biggest Latino population--intact, thus increasing the chances for a serious attempt to put a Latino on the board in 2004. The approval of the new boundaries came despite last-minute pleas from city officials to move portions of Newport Beach and Anaheim into other districts to ease the cities' future planning decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call it Boot Camp, and it might be the only one where men change diapers while listening to songs by Mexican crooner Vicente Fernandez. The all-male rap sessions, conducted in Spanish, encourage men to share their greatest concerns about imminent fatherhood: going to work after nights without sleep, stretching their paychecks a little further, dealing with meddling in-laws, caring for recuperating wives, having sex after the birth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call it Boot Camp, and it might be the only one where men change diapers while listening to songs by Mexican crooner Vicente Fernandez. The all-male rap sessions, conducted in Spanish, encourage men to share their greatest concerns about imminent fatherhood: going to work after nights with no sleep, stretching their paychecks a little further, dealing with meddling in-laws, caring for recuperating wives, having sex after the birth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ramiro Cervantes is back out on the streets. But these days, he's there to help, not hurt. Cervantes, a self-described former gang member who at 14 packed .22-caliber and 9-millimeter pistols on Santa Ana streets, is trying to help build a sense of community among the city's lowest-income residents. Now 18, Cervantes is one of 12 youth health outreach workers at Latino Health Access who are using unique techniques to attack problems in Santa Ana's poorest neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When all nine of your family members live in the same apartment, it's hard to sneak out. Elvia Flores, 17, and two of her sisters pulled off the feat early Sunday morning. Instead of making a break for freedom, though, the trio let their parents know where they were by singing just after dawn in front of their Santa Ana home. When their groggy mother realized her children were waking her with songs for Mother's Day, she began to cry. "How can you not?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County officials got their first taste Wednesday of what is likely to be a lively debate over how to redraw Orange County's political boundaries when a Latino civil rights group submitted its suggested redistricting plan. According to the League of United Latin American Citizens, Orange County's supervisorial boundaries need to be redrawn to preserve Santa Ana's ethnic population in one district, increasing the chances of a Latino being elected to the Board of Supervisors. "It's time.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Rivero grew up stamping envelopes in the direct mail-service industry. Along the way, he realized that U.S. companies do a lot of business by mail: They collect bills by mail, sell products by mail and even send junk. When he saved enough money, Rivero started his own direct mail service called Mini-Mailers Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ
A broad-based, nonpartisan group of Latinos proposed Wednesday that the city overhaul its at-large election system and begin electing City Council members from districts. In a letter hand-delivered to City Hall, the Orange County Hispanic Committee for Fair Elections issued its first warning that it intends to be involved in the redistricting process. Santa now has a 65% Latino population--a 111% increase since 1980.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials got their first taste Wednesday of what is likely to be a lively debate over how to redraw the county's political boundaries, when a Latino civil rights group submitted its suggested redistricting plan. According to the League of United Latin American Citizens, Orange County's supervisorial boundaries need to be redrawn to preserve Santa Ana's ethnic population in one district, increasing the chances of a Latino being elected to the Board of Supervisors. "It's time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Avelino Garcia, a.k.a. the Cactus King, never drew large crowds until recently. Then again, until four years ago, he never had a venue. That's when El Nopal Mercado opened in San Juan Capistrano and he got his gig peeling needles off succulent nopal cactus paddles that are sold at the busy market. Now, everyone stops to say hello.
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