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Hispanics Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1991 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting statewide trends, San Diego's population became more racially and ethnically diverse in the 1980s, with the county's white majority shrinking while Hispanics and Asians recorded sizable increases, U.S. Census data shows. Hispanics now account for 20% of the county's nearly 2.5 million population, while the number of Asians more than doubled during the past decade to surpass blacks as the region's second largest minority group.
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NATIONAL
March 24, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
The Hispanic population in the United States grew by 43% in the last decade, surpassing 50 million and accounting for about 1 out of 6 Americans, the Census Bureau reported Thursday. Analysts seized on data showing that the growth was propelled by a surge in births in the U.S., rather than immigration, pointing to a growing generational shift in which Hispanics continue to gain political clout and, by 2050, could make up a third of the U.S. population. "In the adult population, many immigrants helped the increase, but the child population is increasingly more Hispanic," said D'Vera Cohn, a senior writer at the Pew Research Center.
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NATIONAL
March 24, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
The Hispanic population in the United States grew by 43% in the last decade, surpassing 50 million and accounting for about 1 out of 6 Americans, the Census Bureau reported Thursday. Analysts seized on data showing that the growth was propelled by a surge in births in the U.S., rather than immigration, pointing to a growing generational shift in which Hispanics continue to gain political clout and, by 2050, could make up a third of the U.S. population. "In the adult population, many immigrants helped the increase, but the child population is increasingly more Hispanic," said D'Vera Cohn, a senior writer at the Pew Research Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | JOSH LEMIEUX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's not strict English. Ni puro espanol. No, what's spoken here along la frontera is a mixture--sometimes logical, sometimes goofy--of two languages and two cultures. "Our parents speak English and our grandparents hablan espanol, " says "Rock 'n' Roll" James Echavarria, a disc jockey on bilingual radio station KIWW. Rock 'n' Roll James hits the airwaves with a rapid-fire delivery--and no pauses between English and Spanish: "KIWW 96, the Valley's choice for hot tejano hits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1991 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South Bay's Asian and Hispanic communities have swelled dramatically in the last 10 years, mirroring increases recorded in much of California, newly released census figures show. The figures, which provide the first detailed look at the ethnic information gathered during the 1990 census, continue a trend that demographers say first became evident in the 1980 census.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comparing the Los Angeles County redistricting to the gerrymandering in the South, a political scientist Thursday testified in a voting rights trial that county supervisors have drawn their districts with a "racially discriminatory intent" aimed at weakening Latino political influence. "It was not possible to protect five Anglo incumbents . . . without discriminating against the Hispanic population," said J. Morgan Kousser, a Caltech professor. Kousser was paid $30,000 by the plaintiffs in a historic lawsuit accusing the supervisors of splitting up Latinos among three districts, thereby diluting their political influence in violation of the federal Voting Rights Act. After studying county redistricting from 1959 to 1989, he submitted to U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon a 95-page report concluding that "anti-Hispanic gerrymandering in Los Angeles bears a good deal of resemblance to anti-black gerrymandering in the Deep South from Reconstruction on."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | JOSH LEMIEUX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's not strict English. Ni puro espanol. No, what's spoken here along la frontera is a mixture--sometimes logical, sometimes goofy--of two languages and two cultures. "Our parents speak English and our grandparents hablan espanol, " says "Rock 'n' Roll" James Echavarria, a disc jockey on bilingual radio station KIWW. Rock 'n' Roll James hits the airwaves with a rapid-fire delivery--and no pauses between English and Spanish: "KIWW 96, the Valley's choice for hot tejano hits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whites and Hispanics--many seeking either life out of the Los Angeles basin or a steady paycheck in a new country--settled in Ventura County by the tens of thousands during the boom of the 1980s, officials said Monday after new census figures were released. The new figures showed that the county grew by 26.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | MICHELE FUETSCH and TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Asian and Hispanic populations have surged in Long Beach and the Southeast Los Angeles County area over the last decade, while the Anglo population in almost every community has dropped, according to U.S. Census data released this week. The Asian population more than doubled in 13 cities, including Cerritos, which has become the community with the largest percentage of Asian residents in the Southeast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1991 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South Bay's Asian and Hispanic communities have swelled dramatically in the last 10 years, mirroring increases recorded in much of California, newly released census figures show. The figures, which provide the first detailed look at the ethnic information gathered during the 1990 census, continue a trend that demographers say first became evident in the 1980 census.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | MICHELE FUETSCH and TINA GRIEGO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Asian and Hispanic populations have surged in Long Beach and the Southeast Los Angeles County area over the last decade, while the Anglo population in almost every community has dropped, according to U.S. Census data released this week. The Asian population more than doubled in 13 cities, including Cerritos, which has become the community with the largest percentage of Asian residents in the Southeast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1991 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting statewide trends, San Diego's population became more racially and ethnically diverse in the 1980s, with the county's white majority shrinking while Hispanics and Asians recorded sizable increases, U.S. Census data shows. Hispanics now account for 20% of the county's nearly 2.5 million population, while the number of Asians more than doubled during the past decade to surpass blacks as the region's second largest minority group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1991 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whites and Hispanics--many seeking either life out of the Los Angeles basin or a steady paycheck in a new country--settled in Ventura County by the tens of thousands during the boom of the 1980s, officials said Monday after new census figures were released. The new figures showed that the county grew by 26.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comparing the Los Angeles County redistricting to the gerrymandering in the South, a political scientist Thursday testified in a voting rights trial that county supervisors have drawn their districts with a "racially discriminatory intent" aimed at weakening Latino political influence. "It was not possible to protect five Anglo incumbents . . . without discriminating against the Hispanic population," said J. Morgan Kousser, a Caltech professor. Kousser was paid $30,000 by the plaintiffs in a historic lawsuit accusing the supervisors of splitting up Latinos among three districts, thereby diluting their political influence in violation of the federal Voting Rights Act. After studying county redistricting from 1959 to 1989, he submitted to U.S. District Judge David V. Kenyon a 95-page report concluding that "anti-Hispanic gerrymandering in Los Angeles bears a good deal of resemblance to anti-black gerrymandering in the Deep South from Reconstruction on."
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