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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, Special to the Times
On a parched field near Hansen Dam, about a dozen men gather under a blazing sun to play a ritual ball game handed down to them by their ancient Aztec forefathers. It is pelota Mixteca. This match pits the San Fernando home team against a team from Santa Barbara. Team members tape their hands and put on guantes, oversize mitts made of thick leather with hundreds of nails driven into them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As many San Fernando Valley residents voted for former Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa as for conservative businessman Steve Soboroff, according to an analysis of election returns by The Times. Villaraigosa took 28% and Soboroff 28.1%. But James K. Hahn, who will face Villaraigosa in a runoff in June, took just 15.9% of the Valley's vote. The importance of the Valley to both campaigns was attested to Wednesday by the candidates' appearances in that part of the city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As many San Fernando Valley residents voted for former Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa as for conservative businessman Steve Soboroff, according to an analysis of election returns by The Times. Villaraigosa took 28% and Soboroff 28.1%. But James K. Hahn, who will face Villaraigosa in a runoff in June, took just 15.9% of the Valley's vote. The importance of the Valley to both campaigns was attested to Wednesday by the candidates' appearances in that part of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Fernando Valley residents voted for former Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa as often as they did for conservative businessman Steve Soboroff, according to an analysis of election returns by The Times. Villaraigosa took 28% and Soboroff 28.1%. But James K. Hahn, who will face Villaraigosa in a runoff in June, took just 15.9% of the Valley's vote. The importance of the Valley to both campaigns was illustrated Wednesday by the candidates' appearances in that part of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
San Fernando Valley residents voted for former Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa as often as they did for conservative businessman Steve Soboroff, according to an analysis of election returns by The Times. Villaraigosa took 28% and Soboroff 28.1%. But James K. Hahn, who will face Villaraigosa in a runoff in June, took just 15.9% of the Valley's vote. The importance of the Valley to both campaigns was illustrated Wednesday by the candidates' appearances in that part of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
The San Fernando Valley arm of Bienestar, an HIV education, outreach and case management organization for Latinos, is looking to expand its services. The organization distributes brochures on safer sex and provides a weekly support group conducted in Spanish. It also dispatches outreach workers--who are themselves HIV-positive and Latino--to places in the Valley where Latino men tend to congregate. With 82 HIV-positive clients, the Valley Bienestar also hopes to begin offering a drop-in center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To some, the Latino vendors who sell snacks and refreshments on the streets of San Fernando are a familiar and welcome sight, part of the backdrop in a city whose population is 83% Latino. To others, including some Latinos and many Anglos, those peddling their wares from pushcarts as they would in Mexico or other Latin American countries are looked upon warily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In a surprise ceremony, six San Fernando Valley LAPD officers were honored Tuesday by the Latin American Civic Assn. in recognition of their efforts to improve relations between police and the Latino community. The officers believed they were attending a regular monthly meeting of the Spanish Language Outreach Committee at the association's San Fernando offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
A culturally rich Day of the Dead festival, featuring entertainment, art exhibits and a procession, will be held Sunday at Brand Park. Musicians and dancers will perform at the seventh annual Dia de los Muertos Festival presented by the San Fernando Valley Latino Arts Council and CultuAzlan. Interest in the event, the Mexican remembrance of those who have passed away, has increased in recent years, organizers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Peering out from stagecoach windows, weary travelers making their way from Los Angeles to San Francisco in the mid-1800s would come upon a welcome sight when they reached the northeast San Fernando Valley. Situated among the cattle and wild mustard was Lopez Station, where the stage stopped twice a week until 1874, when it was replaced by the railroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
A culturally rich Day of the Dead festival, featuring entertainment, art exhibits and a procession, will be held Sunday at Brand Park. Musicians and dancers will perform at the seventh annual Dia de los Muertos Festival presented by the San Fernando Valley Latino Arts Council and CultuAzlan. Interest in the event, the Mexican remembrance of those who have passed away, has increased in recent years, organizers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere between the mariachi bands and the cantors belting out songs today at the San Fernando Valley's first Latino-Jewish festival is an attempt to find harmony between two groups whose political ambitions have occasionally clashed. State Sen. Richard Alarcon (D-Sylmar), who organized the event, knows the perils of ethnic politicking as well as anyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere between the mariachi bands and the cantors today at the Valley's first Latino-Jewish festival is an attempt to find harmony between two groups whose political ambitions have occasionally clashed. State Sen. Richard Alarcon (D-Sylmar), who organized the event, knows the perils of ethnic politicking as well as anyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, Special to the Times
On a parched field near Hansen Dam, about a dozen men gather under a blazing sun to play a ritual ball game handed down to them by their ancient Aztec forefathers. It is pelota Mixteca. This match pits the San Fernando home team against a team from Santa Barbara. Team members tape their hands and put on guantes, oversize mitts made of thick leather with hundreds of nails driven into them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Peering out from stagecoach windows, weary travelers making their way from Los Angeles to San Francisco in the mid-1800s would come upon a welcome sight when they reached the northeast San Fernando Valley. Situated among the cattle and wild mustard was Lopez Station, where the stage stopped twice a week until 1874, when it was replaced by the railroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In a surprise ceremony, six San Fernando Valley LAPD officers were honored Tuesday by the Latin American Civic Assn. in recognition of their efforts to improve relations between police and the Latino community. The officers believed they were attending a regular monthly meeting of the Spanish Language Outreach Committee at the association's San Fernando offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing mistrust he said confronted him after the Rodney G. King beating, the San Fernando Valley's top police official on Thursday convened a panel to study often-hostile relations between officers and Spanish-speaking residents. The 20-member Spanish Language Outreach Committee, meeting for the first time in Canoga Park, agreed that fear of authority figures prevents many Latinos from reporting crimes and obtaining police protection, and that language and cultural barriers are partly to blame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing public mistrust highlighted by the Rodney G. King beating, a top Los Angeles police official on Thursday convened a panel to study sometimes-hostile relations between officers and Spanish-speaking residents in the San Fernando Valley. The 20-member Spanish Language Outreach Committee is the brainchild of Deputy Chief Mark A. Kroeker, who oversees the Los Angeles Police Department's five patrol areas in the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
The San Fernando Valley arm of Bienestar, an HIV education, outreach and case management organization for Latinos, is looking to expand its services. The organization distributes brochures on safer sex and provides a weekly support group conducted in Spanish. It also dispatches outreach workers--who are themselves HIV-positive and Latino--to places in the Valley where Latino men tend to congregate. With 82 HIV-positive clients, the Valley Bienestar also hopes to begin offering a drop-in center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To some, the Latino vendors who sell snacks and refreshments on the streets of San Fernando are a familiar and welcome sight, part of the backdrop in a city whose population is 83% Latino. To others, including some Latinos and many Anglos, those peddling their wares from pushcarts as they would in Mexico or other Latin American countries are looked upon warily.
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