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October 30, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each morning, the young Latina women walk up the hill from the Mission district, past the orange-and-black signs that proclaim "Save Army Street," to care for the children and clean the houses of Noe Valley. Crossing a great cultural divide, they leave the colorful barrio where Cesar Chavez is a hero and enter the tidy streets and Victorian homes where, these days, the name of the late farm worker leader is a nagging annoyance.
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NEWS
October 30, 1995 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each morning, the young Latina women walk up the hill from the Mission district, past the orange-and-black signs that proclaim "Save Army Street," to care for the children and clean the houses of Noe Valley. Crossing a great cultural divide, they leave the colorful barrio where Cesar Chavez is a hero and enter the tidy streets and Victorian homes where, these days, the name of the late farm worker leader is a nagging annoyance.
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NEWS
July 29, 1987
Surveys sponsored by the San Francisco Department of Health indicate that the city's black and Latino communities are at high risk for AIDS. Dr. David Werdegar, public health director and the man who commissioned the studies, said the results show that about 36% of San Francisco's black citizens are at high risk of becoming infected with AIDS because of drug use or unsafe sex, while about 13% of the city's slightly larger Latino population are at risk for similar reasons.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 100,000 runners traversed the city Sunday morning in a yearly frolic--part footrace, part street circus--known here as the Bay to Breakers. Live TV and radio covered the goings on, which followed two days of parties and a contest for the most witty and wild costumes. For some people, the mix of athleticism and zaniness is a quintessential San Francisco celebration, a daytime cousin of the Black and White Ball earlier this month.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Patrons of a predominantly Latino nightclub in San Francisco sued immigration officials, contending they were harassed and intimidated when agents raided the club in search of illegal aliens. Shortly before midnight on July 22, about 20 agents of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and the state Alcoholic and Beverage Control Bureau sealed the exits to Club Elegante, searched and handcuffed some of the 150 patrons and demanded identification or proof of citizenship from others.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 100,000 runners traversed the city Sunday morning in a yearly frolic--part footrace, part street circus--known here as the Bay to Breakers. Live TV and radio covered the goings on, which followed two days of parties and a contest for the most witty and wild costumes. For some people, the mix of athleticism and zaniness is a quintessential San Francisco celebration, a daytime cousin of the Black and White Ball earlier this month.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Patrons of a predominantly Latino nightclub in San Francisco sued immigration officials, contending they were harassed and intimidated when agents raided the club in search of illegal aliens. Shortly before midnight on July 22, about 20 agents of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service and the state Alcoholic and Beverage Control Bureau sealed the exits to Club Elegante, searched and handcuffed some of the 150 patrons and demanded identification or proof of citizenship from others.
NEWS
July 29, 1987
Surveys sponsored by the San Francisco Department of Health indicate that the city's black and Latino communities are at high risk for AIDS. Dr. David Werdegar, public health director and the man who commissioned the studies, said the results show that about 36% of San Francisco's black citizens are at high risk of becoming infected with AIDS because of drug use or unsafe sex, while about 13% of the city's slightly larger Latino population are at risk for similar reasons.
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