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Hispanics Southern California

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NEWS
May 24, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Armando Melendez was a 5-year-old boy growing up in El Salvador, he fell under the sway of a crazy uncle who had futbol on the brain. Instead of taking Armando to school in the mornings, Uncle Oscar would secretly spirit the boy off to a park for soccer practice. Long before he could read or write much, Armando knew how to caress a leather ball with his instep, how to make the bouncing sphere obey his will.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The homeownership rate among Southern California Latinos rose sharply over the last decade, the result of an increase in the numbers of Latino young adults, steady gains in education and employment opportunities, and the availability of innovative mortgage products. The number of Latinos who own homes in five Southland counties surged 51.4% from 431,101 in 1990 to 652,512 in the last decade, according to the latest Census Bureau figures. Latinos make up about 28% of the region's 2.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some grew up in poor, violent neighborhoods like South-Central. Some were raised by one parent. All say their backgrounds forced them to strive for success. They are seven high school seniors in the Los Angeles area given the Regional Hispanic Heritage Youth Award, considered one of the most prestigious Latino recognitions. The students were selected for their character, academic accomplishments and community involvement.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Armando Melendez was a 5-year-old boy growing up in El Salvador, he fell under the sway of a crazy uncle who had futbol on the brain. Instead of taking Armando to school in the mornings, Uncle Oscar would secretly spirit the boy off to a park for soccer practice. Long before he could read or write much, Armando knew how to caress a leather ball with his instep, how to make the bouncing sphere obey his will.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY Robert Smaus..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disney's movie "Dick Tracy" is big at the box office, but some local Asian and Latino groups are unhappy with Disney-owned KCAL Channel 9 for reviving a 29-year-old "Dick Tracy" cartoon series that they say contains ethnic and racial stereotypes. "When you exaggerate racial and ethnic mannerisms and characteristics, that is racism, no matter how you slice it," said Raul Ruiz, Chicano studies professor at Cal State Northridge.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Meruelo hopes to someday be known as the pizza king of Southern California's Latino community. The energetic, boyish-looking 27-year-old founder of the La Pizza Loca restaurant chain is off to a good start. Since founding his company five years ago, Meruelo has assembled a chain of 26 pizza delivery outlets in mostly Latino neighborhoods of Orange and Los Angeles counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite opposition from a vocal minority who briefly disrupted the NAACP's national convention, the civil rights group Wednesday approved a resolution calling for a repeal of penalties against employers who hire illegal immigrant workers. The vote gives a major boost to the drive to abolish employer sanctions and helps salve wounds that have developed in the relationship between the NAACP and Latino groups.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
For nearly three decades, Disneyland seemed to ignore the Latino market. While the Magic Kingdom's advertisements have filled the mainstream media since the theme park opened in 1955, there was virtually nothing targeted specifically for the growing Latino market. Then some of Disney's marketing experts realized that a big mistake had been made. After all, while more than 30% of the Los Angeles area's population is Latino, less than 15% of the Magic Kingdom's visitors are.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1994 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Easy credit. Brand name merchandise. Friendly sales clerks who speak the language. This combination is what keeps thousands of Latino customers in Southern California coming back. Bienvenidos . Welcome to Central, an upscale department store-style retailer where a sign in Spanish at the entrance invites customers inside. Other signs also let shoppers know they can charge their purchases--even if they don't have an established credit history. "We will help you to buy today at Central.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Munoz, who grew up in Pacoima kickin' it in the park with friends who would become anti-gang activists and world-class kick boxers, ignored the pleas of his mother and entered the entertainment business. Not too long ago, the Northridge filmmaker was approached by an industry executive who was eager to make a film that would reach the growing Latino audience. Do anything, the executive told Munoz, and we'll pay for it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2001 | HECTOR BECERRA and FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A decade ago, Santa Ana, El Monte and Oxnard had zero Latino mayors. Now they all do. That's one reflection of a Census Bureau report, released today, that listed the three cities and unincorporated East Los Angeles among America's 10 leading Latino hubs. East L.A.--96.8% Latino, according to Census 2000--had the highest concentration of Latinos of any American community with 100,000 or more people. Santa Ana (76.1%), El Monte (72.4%) and Oxnard (66.2%) ranked seventh through ninth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2001 | HANG NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some grew up in poor, violent neighborhoods like South-Central. Some were raised by one parent. All say their backgrounds forced them to strive for success. They are seven high school seniors in the Los Angeles area given the Regional Hispanic Heritage Youth Award, considered one of the most prestigious Latino recognitions. The students were selected for their character, academic accomplishments and community involvement.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2000 | Margaret Ramirez
A Southern California theologian has received a $1.3-million grant to head a groundbreaking three-year national study on Latinos and religion. Gaston Espinosa, assistant professor of religious studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, was named director of the Hispanic Churches in American Public Life Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2000 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Authorities are investigating at least two Southland firms they believe have duped thousands of Latino families into buying expensive home water filtration systems by preying on their fears of bad tap water.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting a stable marketplace in which most people seem to be set in their listening habits, the Arbitron radio ratings that came out Friday were topped by the same five stations as the previous three-month period. Still in the No. 1 and 2 spots for the Los Angeles-Orange County market--for the fourth quarter in a row--were Spanish-language stations KSCA-FM (101.9), playing Mexican regional music, and KLVE-FM (107.5), featuring adult contemporary music.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Explosive population growth in Southern California could give Latinos a potential voting majority in four new congressional districts, three in the state Senate and seven in the state Assembly, representatives of Latino organizations told a legislative committee Saturday. Asian-Pacific American groups also argued for a bigger role in California government on the basis of a 119% increase in population in Los Angeles County during the 1980s, to 955,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1999 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I love this!" Haz Montana says with the same kind of enthusiasm Robert Duvall had for napalm in "Apocalypse Now." "I love this format. I love this music. I love being in a radio station that is presented in Spanish. I really do. I don't know why. Maybe I'm a freak." Well, that's a possibility. Let's just say it's rare for the son of Iraqi immigrants, raised in a Jewish neighborhood, to go on to program a Spanish-language radio station in the nation's most competitive market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1999 | JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
All eyes are fixed on 16-year-old Sandy Caldera, standing in front of the altar at Our Lady of Loretto Church in Echo Park. Her long black hair is partly tied back; she wears black pants and a frilly but modest blouse. A microphone is in her hand. She has only to smile and about 400 people rise to their feet and begin swaying their bodies and waving their hands in air as if in prayer. One man likens her to an angel. "An instrument of God," he says. A young woman says Sandy is her inspiration.
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