Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHispanics Southern United States
IN THE NEWS

Hispanics Southern United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"What's a yuppie Republican like me doing in a church filled with blacks?" Marty Connors mused one recent Saturday morning on his way to the New Jerusalem Baptist Church in this central Alabama town. Actually, he knew exactly what he was doing. As one of the rising stars of the Alabama GOP, the 33-year-old Connors intends to run for Congress from this area in 1992, after the state Legislature draws new congressional district lines based on this year's census.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
"What's a yuppie Republican like me doing in a church filled with blacks?" Marty Connors mused one recent Saturday morning on his way to the New Jerusalem Baptist Church in this central Alabama town. Actually, he knew exactly what he was doing. As one of the rising stars of the Alabama GOP, the 33-year-old Connors intends to run for Congress from this area in 1992, after the state Legislature draws new congressional district lines based on this year's census.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Ernie Pantoja traveled the migrant worker stream from Mexico through Chicago, Florida, Tennessee and other Southern states before arriving here in 1985 and "settling out" of the flow. Pantoja, 34, now earns a living year round by picking tomatoes and planting pine trees in this quiet farm community about 35 miles northeast of Birmingham. It's backbreaking work, but he says it's worth it because he likes small-town Alabama.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Ernie Pantoja traveled the migrant worker stream from Mexico through Chicago, Florida, Tennessee and other Southern states before arriving here in 1985 and "settling out" of the flow. Pantoja, 34, now earns a living year round by picking tomatoes and planting pine trees in this quiet farm community about 35 miles northeast of Birmingham. It's backbreaking work, but he says it's worth it because he likes small-town Alabama.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
In the four years since he moved to this rural northwest Georgia town, Tony Cervantes has been harassed by his neighbors, threatened at gunpoint and terrorized by a cross-burning in his front yard. Once, when he and his wife, Angela, stopped at a Main Street convenience store for a simple purchase, they were accosted by two men who snarled at them: "On this side of town, we kill niggers and Mexicans. Mexicans are niggers that don't talk plain."
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
In the four years since he moved to this rural northwest Georgia town, Tony Cervantes has been harassed by his neighbors, threatened at gunpoint and terrorized by a cross-burning in his front yard. Once, when he and his wife, Angela, stopped at a Main Street convenience store for a simple purchase, they were accosted by two men who snarled at them: "On this side of town, we kill niggers and Mexicans. Mexicans are niggers that don't talk plain."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|