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BUSINESS
February 23, 1993 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignacio E. Lozano Jr., former publisher of the largest Spanish-language newspaper in the United States, is among the 50 wealthiest Latinos in the United States, according to the first such listing by Hispanic Business Magazine. Lozano, 65, who turned over the reins of Los Angeles-based La Opinion Newspapers to his son, Jose, in 1986, is president of Lozano Enterprises Inc., the parent corporation of La Opinion. He lives in Lido Isle.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly released 2000 census data depict several of California's largest Latino groups as shrinking in the 1990s, an unexpected, improbable result that has community agencies complaining and demographers concerned. Some experts attribute it to a simple change in the census form. Others believe it is a consequence of an evolving pan-Latino consciousness that discourages people from retaining strong national identities.
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NEWS
December 26, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nine-year-old Juan Carlos Osorio considers Christopher Columbus a hero for "discovering America" and displaying great courage. "If it was true the world was square, he would have died. He would have fallen off the ocean and into the sky," the fourth-grader said. On the other hand, he also knows that the famous explorer took American Indians as slaves and that they contracted devastating diseases from the crews of Columbus' ships.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | Associated Press
More Latino children are attending segregated schools in the United States than before, while segregation of black students is virtually unchanged from the early 1970s, a new study concludes. University of Chicago researchers also found that public schools in New York state are the most segregated in the nation for Latino students, while Illinois is the most segregated state for black students.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | BETH KLEID
It looks like the best of times for Nosotros, an organization that honors Latinos in the entertainment industry. Members are happily celebrating their 20th anniversary and what they call a boom time for Latinos in the arts.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite widespread perceptions to the contrary, the nation's fast-growing Latino population is less a homogenous sociopolitical monolith than a diverse patchwork of distinct, sometimes conflicting viewpoints and interests. That conclusion is the core finding of a soon-to-be released study that is billed as the largest survey of the U.S. Latino population, focusing on those of Mexican, Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry. "This is not a simple population; you can't generalize," said Rodolfo O.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1990 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most widely watched Spanish-language news program in America was batting three for three during a recent newscast. Univision had dispatched correspondents to cover the three major stories of the day: The Persian Gulf crisis, the University of Florida serial killings and the Illinois tornadoes. And in each case, the news crews had obtained video interviews with victims, soldiers and families of a dead soldier-- in Spanish.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
A badly flawed government study was used by NAACP leaders last week as the excuse for joining militant Latinos and others in a campaign to be nicer to companies that use illegal aliens as a source of cheap, exploitable labor. The convention of the black civil rights group voted to ask Congress to get rid of a provision in the 1986 immigration reform act that imposed stiff penalties on companies that knowingly hire foreigners who are here illegally.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of minority groups who have fought together for decades are finding themselves increasingly divided over immigration concerns that threaten to pit black Americans against other ethnic groups, particularly Latinos. Until now the nation's varied minority organizations have managed to smooth over differences to maintain a successful and united front, working most often through the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new census study of America's Latinos dramatizes the pivotal role that people of Mexican ancestry are playing in reshaping the nation's demographic makeup. People of Mexican lineage, who two decades ago were largely confined to the Southwest, California and Chicago, are now settling around the country and gaining ground in numbers on such long-established groups as German Americans and Irish Americans, mostly the offspring of earlier waves of immigration. Mexicans accounted for 58.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | ALEX ABELLA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I was standing at an LAX arrival gate, holding up a sign with a name, just like the dozen or so limousine drivers, waiting for my party to arrive. Out trooped Fran Drescher and other celebrities from the first-class section, some of whom I vaguely recognized from the pages of magazines. But the sign I was holding read "Juan Gonzalez," whose renown was first earned at a time when practically the only other Latino name in the news was Richard Nixon's friend and confidant, Bebe Rebozo.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The government Thursday released the first official census 2000 figures, showing a rapid growth of Latino and Asian populations--even in areas of the Deep South and Midwest. The Latino population in Wisconsin, for example, grew by 107% during the 1990s, to 192,921. In Mississippi, the Asian population grew by at least 50% and as much as 84%--a range that takes into account a new option that allowed people to check off more than one racial category for the first time.
NEWS
March 8, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's fast-growing Latino population may be large enough to equal or perhaps surpass African Americans as the country's largest minority group, according to preliminary data from the 2000 census. Early census figures, contained in reports prepared by a committee of Census Bureau experts, show an estimated Latino population of 35.5 million, compared with 34.2 million African Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latino leaders Friday announced their final push to register nearly a million Latino voters nationwide for the November presidential election. The drive is part of a growing effort to realize the potential of the estimated 13 million eligible Latino voters in the U.S.--nearly half of whom are not registered. Antonio Gonzalez, president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, a leader in the Latino Vote 2000 drive, said 1.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baldo wears an earring and loose clothes. He daydreams of cars and girls. He's a typical American teenager. Baldo also has brown skin and is a comic-strip character. His name is short for Baldomero--a "funny" name given him by traditional Latino parents--and he is sometimes caught up in scenes that highlight his bicultural life, much like those experienced by many Latinos in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A last-ditch attempt by Orange County Rep. Dana Rohrabacher to head off growing opposition to his plan to promote "merit-only" college admissions policies collapsed last week when a key California congressman rejected the second of two proposed compromises. The opposition of Asian-Americans to his proposals has surprised Rohrabacher, who says his intention is to correct an injustice suffered by that ethnic group.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hugo Pimienta considers himself a bridge. At his son's soccer games, the Mexican-born millionaire and his wife shuttle up and down the sidelines, forming a rare link between Latino immigrant parents clustered at one end of the field and the wealthy white Westsiders on the other. And through his Pueblo Corp., Pimienta is trying to bring together the fast-growing immigrant consumer market with companies eager to sell to it.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
In an effort to get more Hispanics online, a Spanish-English Web site is handing out more than 2 million computer disks offering free Internet access customized for bilingual use. Quepasa.com will use Internet service from NetZero, which already offers free access in English to 3 million subscribers. During their time online, subscribers must look at ads, some targeted specifically to the Hispanic audience.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the specter of former Gov. Pete Wilson loomed over their heads, Republican Party leaders proclaimed Thursday that the Democrats' lead in attracting the increasingly important Latino vote is not as large nationally as they had feared, and that the GOP can bridge the gap simply by appealing to Latinos' traditional social values.
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