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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | By Chris Barton
In a development that carries an unsettling parallel with the Taliban's destruction of the Buddhas of Bamiyan in Afghanistan in March 2001, the Islamist group Ansar Dine has destroyed historic Sufi mausoleums in the Malian city of Timbuktu while locals looked on. Armed with pick axes, hoes and automatic weapons, the attackers laid waste to three mausoleums and at least seven tombs, which only days ago were added to UNESCO's list...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Most of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County are failing to adequately protect historically important structures that are in danger of being razed, according to a new study by the Los Angeles Conservancy. A “preservation report card” assigns an “F” to 51 cities and all of the county's unincorporated communities -- - some that made no effort to save their historic places since the group's last county-wide assessment was completed six years ago. Conservancy leaders said some newer communities incorrectly believe they have no historic resources, and officials of other communities have delayed creating historic preservation programs because of budget cuts tied to the recession.
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NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Open Doors La Jolla provides an insider's look at historic and prominent buildings in the California coastal town near San Diego. Community buildings designed by architect Irving Gill, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego's La Jolla site and six other buildings will open to the public for free for one day in November. The deal: It's the third year for the Open Doors event in what's called the town's cultural zone. Stops include the city's Recreation Center and Woman's Club , both designed by Gill; the Bishop's School, founded by philanthropist and donor Ellen Browning Scripps; and the Cuvier Club , which began life as a World War II USO hall.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
The partial government shutdown in October was largely to blame for a 3% drop in visitors to America's national parks in 2013, according to a report released Monday by the National Park Service. The country's 401 parks, historic sites and recreation areas drew 273.6 million visitors in 2013, about 9 million fewer than the previous year, according to the report. The 16-day government shutdown, sparked by a budget dispute in Washington, was responsible for reducing the visitation numbers by about 7.9 million, the report said.
NATIONAL
June 6, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
From battlefields to bridges, historic sites across the country are facing demolition, neglect and encroaching developments. The National Trust for Historic Preservation has added 11 more places to the list of the country's most endangered, including a Revolutionary War battlefield, Malcolm X's home in Boston and the Philadelphia gym where Joe Frazier once trained. The trust is a Washington-based nonprofit that seeks to preserve sites of historic significance. Every year, the group identifies a list of buildings and places that it considers most endangered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Most of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County are failing to adequately protect historically important structures that are in danger of being razed, according to a new study by the Los Angeles Conservancy. A “preservation report card” assigns an “F” to 51 cities and all of the county's unincorporated communities -- - some that made no effort to save their historic places since the group's last county-wide assessment was completed six years ago. Conservancy leaders said some newer communities incorrectly believe they have no historic resources, and officials of other communities have delayed creating historic preservation programs because of budget cuts tied to the recession.
REAL ESTATE
November 14, 2004 | Baltimore Sun
After restoring a home on the site of the Carroll County, Md., birthplace of Francis Scott Key, millionaire history buff William F. Chaney is selling it. The property's connection to the writer of "The Star-Spangled Banner" captivated Chaney, who bought Terra Rubra -- the name means "Red Earth" -- for $1.3 million two years ago.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Two fires ravaged historic sites in the nation's capital, one gutting part of a 134-year-old market and the other destroying irreplaceable documents and art at the Georgetown public library branch. Fire Chief Dennis L. Rubin said the fires were unrelated. The first blaze tore through the Eastern Market, a Capitol Hill landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The city-owned building was empty at the time and there were no injuries, Rubin said.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has signed a 25-year lease to take over a federal historic site where a group of Mormon pioneers are believed to have died in a snowstorm. The Mormon Church and the Bureau of Land Management signed papers in Cheyenne covering 930 acres of public land at Martin's Cove near Casper, culminating years of negotiations.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | Associated Press
The House on Monday approved legislation to create a national historic site within a 650-acre preservation district in former President Jimmy Carter's hometown of Plains, Ga. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Richard Ray (D-Ga.), was passed by a voice vote and sent to the Senate, where a similar bill died last year because there was not enough time for a hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Even for a city in which architectural surprise is no surprise, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple surprises. Do yourself a favor and step inside; the interior has just been magnificently restored. A radiant 1929 mural surrounds the domed synagogue, conveying Jewish history from biblical times to the arrival of Jews in the New World in vivid Hollywood-esque imagery. Commissioned by the Warner brothers, it defies an orthodox reading of the Second Commandment, which forbids graven images.
TRAVEL
January 25, 2014 | Los Angeles Times
The Bancroft Hotel has a great location across the street from UC Berkeley. It's a registered historical landmark but has been modernized and utilizes all organic linens and products and is certified as an environmentally green business. There is complimentary continental breakfast and convenient parking. It is 100% smoke-free. A delightful staff caters to your every need. Rooms from $139. Bancroft Hotel, 2680 Bancroft Way; (510) 549-1000, http://www.bancrofthotel.com Arlene Rosenblatt Santa Monica
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
The new owner of the gigantic, historic Sears Roebuck & Co. distribution center in Boyle Heights said he hopes to create a new community in and around the site. Dating to the 1920s, the complex was once one of the major hubs in the country for distributing Sears catalog products. The nine-story distribution center closed in 1992, though a Sears department store still operates at the site.     "With a property of this size, I have the opportunity to develop an entire neighborhood,” said Izek Shomof, who bought the 1.8-million-square-foot property at Olympic Boulevard and Soto Street on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The mission of America's 400 national parks is to reflect the country's history - no matter how uncomfortable or unflattering - which is why some contain depictions of slavery, the fight for women's suffrage, Japanese internment and the struggle for civil rights. Now that archive could include the contributions of Latinos through the telling of the often tempestuous story of Cesar Chavez. The National Park Service on Thursday announced plans to establish the Cesar Chavez National Historic Park, to recognize the achievements of the activist and the farm labor movement he led. Chavez, who advocated for fair wages and humane conditions for field workers in California and elsewhere, also will be honored as an environmentalist and nonviolent human rights advocate.
SPORTS
October 14, 2013 | Mike Bresnahan
Pau Gasol attacked the Great Wall of China with enough fervor that he had to buy a souvenir T-shirt after sweating through what he wore while hiking. But the wall attacked back. Despite avoiding the sometimes thick and aggressive crowds, the Lakers didn't escape unscathed in their two hours Sunday at the wall. Chris Kaman crushed one of his fingers while tobogganing down a slippery concrete track. Yes. Kaman. Toboggan. Great Wall. His sled, essentially a wheeled cart with a brake, was rammed from behind by teammate Shawne Williams.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Open Doors La Jolla provides an insider's look at historic and prominent buildings in the California coastal town near San Diego. Community buildings designed by architect Irving Gill, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego's La Jolla site and six other buildings will open to the public for free for one day in November. The deal: It's the third year for the Open Doors event in what's called the town's cultural zone. Stops include the city's Recreation Center and Woman's Club , both designed by Gill; the Bishop's School, founded by philanthropist and donor Ellen Browning Scripps; and the Cuvier Club , which began life as a World War II USO hall.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | MARILYN YAQUINTO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years ago, amid wartime paranoia, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an order that transformed 500 desolate acres in eastern California into an internment camp, ringed by barbed wire and occupied by Japanese-Americans who were feared as possible traitors. Marking the anniversary Wednesday, the House voted 400 to 13 to approve a bill designating the Manzanar camp in the Owens Valley as a national historic site, clearing the way for possible reconstruction of the camp's buildings.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
The Chinatown House in Rancho Cucamonga -- one of the last vestiges of the Inland Empire city's Chinese American history -- has been named to the list of America's most endangered historic places by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The two-story building, which dates back to the early 20th century, is among 11 structures and other venues to make the trust's 2013 list. The building had recently been threatened with demolition by the city of Rancho Cucamonga and the Cucamonga Valley Water District, which owns the property.
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