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March 30, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were made by the thousands to guard a dead emperor in his afterlife. For two millenniums, these figures of fired clay--every face different, every man painted in full battle dress--lay buried under tons of rock and soil. But since the first one was unearthed by accident 27 years ago, China's terra cotta warriors have become one of the country's top tourist attractions. And the famous underground army finds itself going mano a mano against a mundane, but insidious, enemy: mold.
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NEWS
March 30, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were made by the thousands to guard a dead emperor in his afterlife. For two millenniums, these figures of fired clay--every face different, every man painted in full battle dress--lay buried under tons of rock and soil. But since the first one was unearthed by accident 27 years ago, China's terra cotta warriors have become one of the country's top tourist attractions. And the famous underground army finds itself going mano a mano against a mundane, but insidious, enemy: mold.
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WORLD
May 28, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - “Ding Jinhao was here.” It was a banal declaration scratched by a teenager at a 3,500-year-old Egyptian temple that has launched a round of soul-searching about bad behavior of Chinese tourists. The Chinese-language graffiti was discovered at Luxor this month by a Chinese tourist who posted a photograph on a microblog in which he deplored the conduct of his countrymen abroad. “I'm so embarrassed that I want to hide myself,” the microblogger wrote last week. Within days, Chinese had outed the vandal as a boy from Nanjing who had visited Egypt with his parents.
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