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NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Washington Post
The Walt Disney Co. said it will open its theme park in Virginia on schedule even if extra freeway lanes and a new interchange needed to serve it are years from completion, although government officials warned that could lead to gridlock for thousands of drivers. Putting 5 million to 6 million annual park guests on western Prince William County's existing narrow roads and four-lane I-66 would create "an enormous problem," said Kathleen K.
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SCIENCE
August 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
Seven years after archeologists discovered evidence of the fort built when Jamestown, Va., was founded in 1607, they finally know how big the triangle-shaped log enclosure was. Based on the finding in 1996 of the fort's east corner and on historical documents, archeologists had been searching for the outlines of a fort that covered 1.75 acres, said William Kelso of the Assn. for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities.
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NEWS
September 10, 1994 | from The Washington Post
The Interior Department, stepping into the debate over a proposed Disney theme park near Haymarket, Va., has warned Prince William County that any development plan that counts on widening roads through nearby Manassas National Battlefield Park is "unacceptable." But in a letter to county officials outlining its position, the federal agency that oversees the park also appeared to push for a compromise between preservationists and the Walt Disney Co. over the $650-million project.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | from The Washington Post
The Interior Department, stepping into the debate over a proposed Disney theme park near Haymarket, Va., has warned Prince William County that any development plan that counts on widening roads through nearby Manassas National Battlefield Park is "unacceptable." But in a letter to county officials outlining its position, the federal agency that oversees the park also appeared to push for a compromise between preservationists and the Walt Disney Co. over the $650-million project.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no cannons exploding this time, no thundering hoofbeats or trumpeted calls-to-arms. But in the quiet country that lies between Washington and the Blue Ridge Mountains, a full-scale battle has been joined. And as was often said about an earlier conflict in these hills and valleys: there ain't nothing civil about it. Today's troops are fighting for economic truth and justice. They are battling about building. Hovering over the whole dispute is this question: Whose history is it, anyway?
SCIENCE
August 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
Seven years after archeologists discovered evidence of the fort built when Jamestown, Va., was founded in 1607, they finally know how big the triangle-shaped log enclosure was. Based on the finding in 1996 of the fort's east corner and on historical documents, archeologists had been searching for the outlines of a fort that covered 1.75 acres, said William Kelso of the Assn. for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis-Brown House in Los Feliz, renowned for its style and concrete-block construction but crippled by unsteady earth and wayward water, landed Thursday on the National Trust for Historic Preservation's annual "most endangered places" list. The list, which trust officials said was distilled from "hundreds" of nominations, highlights 11 endangered historic places nationwide.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Washington Post
The Walt Disney Co. said it will open its theme park in Virginia on schedule even if extra freeway lanes and a new interchange needed to serve it are years from completion, although government officials warned that could lead to gridlock for thousands of drivers. Putting 5 million to 6 million annual park guests on western Prince William County's existing narrow roads and four-lane I-66 would create "an enormous problem," said Kathleen K.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no cannons exploding this time, no thundering hoofbeats or trumpeted calls-to-arms. But in the quiet country that lies between Washington and the Blue Ridge Mountains, a full-scale battle has been joined. And as was often said about an earlier conflict in these hills and valleys: there ain't nothing civil about it. Today's troops are fighting for economic truth and justice. They are battling about building. Hovering over the whole dispute is this question: Whose history is it, anyway?
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