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Historic Sites

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When diggers building the subway in Universal City hit the rich cache of adobe tiles at Campo de Cahuenga four years ago, archeologists hurried to piece together fragments of California history before time swallowed them up again. The city's transportation planners, meanwhile, were busy plotting traffic flow around the bustling Lankershim Boulevard site beside Universal Studios, a scheme that called for widening the road.
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NEWS
September 18, 1987 | Associated Press
A House Interior subcommittee approved legislation Thursday to create a national historic site in former President Jimmy Carter's hometown of Plains, Ga. The panel turned aside an Administration proposal to include designation of a national historic site at the Yorba Linda, Calif., birthplace of former President Richard M. Nixon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House of Representatives subcommittee approved a bill Tuesday to make the Manzanar World War II internment camp a national historic site, despite continued misgivings by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which owns the barren property. DWP Board President Mike Gage said the legislation, amended after a squabble became public last week between the DWP and the bill's sponsor, Rep. Mel Levine (D-Santa Monica), fails to adequately address the utility's concerns about water rights.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal officials frustrated by ongoing destruction at a historic cave site in northern Nevada announced a $1,000 reward to help catch the vandals. The reward will go to anyone who provides information leading to the arrest and prosecution of those responsible for the vandalism at the Lovelock Cave recreation site southwest of Lovelock, Bureau of Land Management officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1991 | ZION BANKS
A committee of city officials and residents has been established to pinpoint and preserve historical spots in one of the county's oldest cities. Councilwoman Evelyn R. Hart will chair the ad hoc historical preservation committee, which will work with the city's Historical Society to research local historical sites.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to establish a national historic site at Manzanar, Calif., home of one of the first World War II internment camps for Japanese-Americans, was endorsed Tuesday by the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service. "The internment of Japanese-Americans was a grave injustice," Jerry L. Rogers, Park Service associate director for cultural affairs, told members of a House subcommittee considering the legislation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not the Louisiana Purchase, but the 3.8-acre cemetery that Will G. Noble bought in 1925 north of the San Fernando Mission was a pretty good bargain for $10. Being the only mortician in the northern San Fernando Valley at the time, it made good business sense for Noble to buy the dusty little cemetery--a lowly plot of dirt inhabited by the earthly remains of those early Valley settlers and Native Americans who lacked the money or Catholic upbringing to be buried at the mission cemetery.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress is getting its kicks from a bill to steer motorists back to Route 66. A House committee Wednesday approved legislation to provide $10 million for preserving historic sites along the Chicago-to-Santa Monica route that served as the main highway for Dust Bowl refugees and other Americans who went West and, in later years, families who piled into station wagons for vacations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA
In 1965, paleontologists for the Los Angeles County Museum made a significant fossil find in Costeau Park: 50,000-year-old bones, many belonging to creatures such as camels, mammoths and saber-tooth cats, all long extinct. Tonight, the City Council will consider recognizing Costeau Park and two other sites as historically significant places in Laguna Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1998 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and EDWARD M. YOON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Native Americans once built a thriving village in the shadow of the jutting boulders here. Later, Mexican settlers raised adobe homes. Then came the stagecoaches, rattling across steep and rocky roads. Now, the 670-acre site of grassy trails and sandstone bluffs tucked in the hills above Chatsworth is set to take on its next role: the state's newest historic park.
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