Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHistorical Perspective
IN THE NEWS

Historical Perspective

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989
"Revisionist Historian" Paul J. Bodnar's letter to The Times (July 9) was highly typical of religious right-zoomed-out-weebies and their continued attempts to present a reshapen historical fiction. I'd like to remind Mr. Bodnar about that concept called "Separation of Church and State." It is the view that these two channels of power should be kept distinct. Now, our founding fathers were struck by this idea as being a rather swell one, and subsequently used in the First Amendment to our Constitution, thus keeping said powers separate, and preventing homogeneity between religious sects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, This article has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
As a leading authority on the Beatles, researcher and author Mark Lewisohn is well aware that there have been far too many books written about the Fab Four. "In general terms and in biographical terms, I think the Beatles have been underserved by books," he said. Yet Lewisohn, 55, just contributed one more to the fray: the 944-page monster "Tune In: The Beatles: All These Years, Vol. 1" (Crown Archetype, $40). So what's left to say after the hundreds of books, documentaries and fictionalized biographical dramas about the Beatles?
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1996
Re "Silence Will Not Debunk the Right's Dark Fantasies," Opinion, April 21: G. John Ikenberry's final point--that the specter haunting us is American ignorance--is true. His remedy, however, stops a step short, with mainstream politicians and other leaders providing strong rebuttal. Our mainstream press could also provide dispassionate, unbiased, historical perspective; I for one am still waiting. VIRGINIA WEBER
OPINION
November 24, 2013
Re "Senate curbs filibusters in historic shift," Nov. 22 Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and his Democratic colleagues have changed the filibuster rule to exclude nominations for administration appointees (except for Supreme Court justices). In other words, the majority now rules. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) denounced Democrats for trying to "break the rules to change the rules. " He spoke passionately about the terrible, unprincipled action by the Democrats.
NEWS
November 6, 1994
Re "Collecting Controversy" (Oct. 19): I suppose I must respect whatever choices African Americans make when dealing with the racist caricatures of the past. However I can't help but question the motives of the many whites who buy and sell such material, and I wonder that Lynell George's article did not mention this aspect of the issue. Perhaps the implications were simply too disturbing. I fear that for children growing up in white households where these degrading images are displayed--not for historical perspective or any such lofty purpose, but for their entertainment value--the past is now. MARIA RAINES Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987
Who is really sabotaging democracy in Haiti? In your editorial you state that "The junta, it is clear, bears the chief responsibility for the brutal betrayal of Haitian hopes." Unfortunately, and typically, this is a short-sighted opinion without much historical perspective. Many years of U.S.-sponsored dictatorships has left a country ill-prepared for democracy. Four-fifths of all Haitians are illiterate. Clean water is available to only 23% of the population. Haitians are the poorest people in this hemisphere and half the population is unemployed.
OPINION
November 7, 2002
Re "Get a Handle on Casinos," editorial, Nov. 4: Given the history of Native Americans' treatment by settlers, miners, missionaries, land speculators, ranchers, oilmen and local, state and federal governments, you must have a broken sense of irony to complain of the "uncontrolled effects of casino construction and expansion on local communities." A little inequity in the tribes' favor does not seem such a bad thing, given the historical perspective. Greg Dziewit San Diego It's a sad lesson that our political system has taught to the Native Americans: Either contribute large sums of money to politicians or remain marginalized.
OPINION
August 28, 2004
Re " 'A New Day' for Two Congregations," Aug. 24: As an Episcopalian, I find the slide into conservatism deeply disturbing. The church was once the thinking man's church. What happens now? Do we return to the thinking of the Middle Ages? It seems to me that conservatism, orthodoxy and literalism leave no room for thought or discussions from a historical perspective. They stifle progress. Consider the very primitive nature of the peoples of the Old Testament, in particular. They were not long out of the caves and the trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2006
I saw Lewis Segal's piece in The Times about "Tap" and wanted to thank him for the coverage ["Fingers Go Tap, Tap, Tap," Aug. 27]. I ran the Added Value dept. at Sony Pictures Home Entertainment that produced the supplemental content for that disc ["Tap"], and it was a labor of love. While I knew that the sales potential wouldn't rival some of our bigger titles, I felt that from a historical perspective it was important to document as best we could this essential art form. I had, in fact, run into Gregory Hines on the Sony lot and spoke with him about providing extra material for "Tap" and "White Nights."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988
No, it wasn't the near-Arctic temperatures we've been having lately here in the Southland that chilled me this morning--it waW. McGarry's Around the Valley piece (Jan. 20). Manifest Destiny is alive and well, it seems, smoldering in the hearts of such citizens as McGarry. Reading that ringing prose of his, we are almost persuaded to forget the cost of conquest, the humiliation and impoverishment of those who've had to prop up our pretensions to superiority. McGarry tips us off with a wink to Lt. Col. Oliver North, who, like the adventurer John C. Fremont, "had to deny what he was really doing, but he knew what the President wanted."
SPORTS
December 11, 2009 | By Diane Pucin
MLB Network President Tony Petitti sounds as excited as a 10-year-old who is opening up a PlayStation on Christmas Day. Somewhere in the MLB film and video archives, a snippet has been found of a 1929 World Series game between the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago Cubs. It is a gem, Petitti says of this footage. Somehow, he says, the network dedicated to all things major league baseball will find a way to make a show out of this clip. Petitti just isn't sure what kind of show yet. The MLB Network debuted last January in 50 million homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Movie remakes are usually a shadow of the original. But the gritty western "3:10 to Yuma" (Lionsgate, $30), arriving today on DVD, is an exception to that rule. Based on an early story by Elmore Leonard, the sagebrush drama was beautifully adapted for film in 1957 with Van Heflin as a cattle rancher who agrees to escort a notorious gunman (Glenn Ford) to Yuma so the bandit can be put on a prison train. The new version -- directed by James Mangold ("Walk the Line"), a longtime admirer of the original -- is respectful to the 1957 film but makes it more palatable for contemporary audiences.
OPINION
January 28, 2007 | David A. Bell, David A. Bell, a professor of history at Johns Hopkins University and a contributing editor for the New Republic, is the author of "The First Total War: Napoleon's Europe and the Birth of Warfare as We Know It."
IMAGINE THAT on 9/11, six hours after the assault on the twin towers and the Pentagon, terrorists had carried out a second wave of attacks on the United States, taking an additional 3,000 lives. Imagine that six hours after that, there had been yet another wave. Now imagine that the attacks had continued, every six hours, for another four years, until nearly 20 million Americans were dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2006
I saw Lewis Segal's piece in The Times about "Tap" and wanted to thank him for the coverage ["Fingers Go Tap, Tap, Tap," Aug. 27]. I ran the Added Value dept. at Sony Pictures Home Entertainment that produced the supplemental content for that disc ["Tap"], and it was a labor of love. While I knew that the sales potential wouldn't rival some of our bigger titles, I felt that from a historical perspective it was important to document as best we could this essential art form. I had, in fact, run into Gregory Hines on the Sony lot and spoke with him about providing extra material for "Tap" and "White Nights."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2006 | Susan King
Seven Samurai (Criterion Collection, $50) THE story is simple -- poor villagers living in the countryside in 16th century Japan hire a group of warriors to protect them from invading bandits intent on robbing them of their barley crop. But Akira Kurosawa's telling of the tale is masterly. All the elements aligned to make "Samurai" a flawless piece of cinema -- the direction, screenplay, performance, music score, cinematography and production design are beyond reproach.
OPINION
August 28, 2004
Re " 'A New Day' for Two Congregations," Aug. 24: As an Episcopalian, I find the slide into conservatism deeply disturbing. The church was once the thinking man's church. What happens now? Do we return to the thinking of the Middle Ages? It seems to me that conservatism, orthodoxy and literalism leave no room for thought or discussions from a historical perspective. They stifle progress. Consider the very primitive nature of the peoples of the Old Testament, in particular. They were not long out of the caves and the trees.
OPINION
November 24, 2013
Re "Senate curbs filibusters in historic shift," Nov. 22 Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and his Democratic colleagues have changed the filibuster rule to exclude nominations for administration appointees (except for Supreme Court justices). In other words, the majority now rules. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) denounced Democrats for trying to "break the rules to change the rules. " He spoke passionately about the terrible, unprincipled action by the Democrats.
BOOKS
August 22, 1993 | David Lohrey
The reading public rarely greets the publication of a highly acclaimed play with more than an imperceptible shrug. Perhaps, as is so often the case, the anonymous reader knows intuitively what few critics are willing to admit, namely, that few theatrical spectacles can stand the scrutiny of a close reading. Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" proves the exception.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Justice Clarence Thomas may be silent in the Supreme Court during public arguments, but he is not shy about making bold pronouncements in written opinions. His latest challenge to conventional wisdom came this week in the Pledge of Allegiance case, when he opined that the Constitution protected a state's right to recognize an official church. Almost everyone has assumed that the opposite is true.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Blame much of it on TV. Just as most entertainment shows fix all problems before the closing credits, so do news programs rev up facile answers prematurely, dismissing context as musty and irrelevant. These self-proclaimed lords of information are not so much architects of learning as carpenters who hammer in minutiae relentlessly. So cheer "Benjamin Franklin," a very smart PBS biography from the production team that five years ago delivered the even more intoxicating "Liberty!
Los Angeles Times Articles
|