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October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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OPINION
April 28, 2014 | By Bruce Ackerman
"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice," the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. assured his followers. But was he right? The arc of American history, at least, has a different shape. During the 19th century, a high point for justice was reached after the Civil War, with Reconstruction Republicans guaranteeing equal protection and voting rights for blacks in the 14th and 15th amendments. But these brave words did not prevent a tragic retreat, from the Gilded Age beginning in the 1880s through the Roaring '20s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The chirping of birds and the whoops of children frolicking in the grassy hollow give the hilltop a sense of serenity now. It was different 40 years ago. There was a gurgling sound, a warning scream and finally a whooshing roar as death and destruction swept down a ridge into a Los Angeles neighborhood. The Baldwin Hills Dam collapsed with the fury of a thousand cloudbursts, sending a 50-foot wall of water down Cloverdale Avenue and slamming into homes and cars on Dec. 14, 1963.
OPINION
April 26, 2014
Re “The 'Mother Ditch,'” April 22 The Times' informative article on the discovery and proposed removal of a portion of the historic “Mother Ditch” leaves one key question unasked: Should this important piece of Los Angeles history, which provided the 19th century town with water from the Los Angeles River, be moved? Although relocating portions of the brick pipe to other sites is certainly better than destroying it, the right solution is to leave it where it is, preserved and visible as witness to embryonic Los Angeles and its always fragile relationship with its vital water supply.
SPORTS
December 3, 2007 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
The way Roman Gabriel tells it, the same characteristics that made him a great football player -- bullheadedness, combativeness, stick-to-itiveness -- served him less favorably in his personal life. Three times divorced, the greatest quarterback in Los Angeles Rams history is estranged from his daughter and four sons and says he has not seen two of his three grandchildren in years. The other, he has never met.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
OPINION
April 26, 2014
Re “The 'Mother Ditch,'” April 22 The Times' informative article on the discovery and proposed removal of a portion of the historic “Mother Ditch” leaves one key question unasked: Should this important piece of Los Angeles history, which provided the 19th century town with water from the Los Angeles River, be moved? Although relocating portions of the brick pipe to other sites is certainly better than destroying it, the right solution is to leave it where it is, preserved and visible as witness to embryonic Los Angeles and its always fragile relationship with its vital water supply.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011
Absolute Monarchs A History of the Papacy John Julius Norwich Random House: $30 The respected historian of the Byzantine Empire and Venice now turns to one of the oldest institutions on Earth and those who have worn the mitred hat during its 2,000-year-old history. (July) American Dreamers How the Left Changed a Nation Michael Kazin Alfred A. Knopf: $27.95 From the early anti-slavery movement to Noam Chomsky and filmmaker Michael Moore, the author examines the radical thinkers and reformers who have transformed American politics and culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1994
The three stages of history: B.C., A.D. and O.J. ROBERT FINKEL North Hollywood
OPINION
August 4, 2013
Re "History meets politics," Opinion, Aug. 2 Sam Wineburg's cogent essay unwittingly makes a powerful case for Howard Zinn's signature contribution to history education. Everyone I know in my profession who assigns "A People's History of the United States" does so for the right reasons: It encourages students to think with some detachment, shows how all histories are "constructed," illuminates the narrative in which we all have been submerged and invites criticism (if only for the simple fact that Zinn himself is so critical)
TRAVEL
April 25, 2014 | By Larry Bleiberg
QUITO, Ecuador - As the four-car train rolls through the clouds and begins its descent of the Andes, Bette Bleeker has a practical concern. "I hope someone checked the brakes," the Chicago resident asks. It's a fair question, given the 1,755-foot descent we're about to make on the Devil's Nose, one of the steepest sections of railroad in the world. The historic route requires several switchbacks, including one length where the train reverses direction and heads backward as it gingerly stair-steps down the highlands.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Abele
A determined historical sweep masks a small-minded bid for easy outrage and heartstrings-pulling in the schematic World War II drama "Walking With the Enemy. " Set in 1944, when the war was essentially over for the Nazis but their reign of terror in occupied territories was still going strong, the movie focuses on the efforts of a young, displaced Hungarian Jew named Elek (Jonas Armstrong) to find his family after escaping from a camp, which turned into a concerted effort to save many Hungarian Jews.
SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | By David Wharton
MESA, Ariz. - A buzz ran through the crowd, an accumulation of murmurs and applause that drifted across the pool to where Michael Phelps stood. It was just loud enough to make the swimmer grin as he stepped onto the block. "You heard people starting to get excited," he said. The 1,200 spectators at poolside weren't alone - an entire sport watched intently as the most-decorated athlete in Olympic history began his comeback from retirement this week. With an unprecedented 22 medals from three Games, Phelps is the Michael Jordan of swimming.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Having a day off on Wednesday, Simi Valley baseball Coach Matt La Belle decided to take his players on a short field trip to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum to see the best exhibition of baseball memorabilia outside of the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Through Sept. 4, the Reagan Library has a baseball exhibition of more than 800 artifacts . Much of it is from the collection of L.A.-based Gary Cypres. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com
SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
What started as a game of crazy bounces and deflections ended precisely that way in overtime and put the Kings on the verge of a stunning playoff elimination. Sharks star forward Patrick Marleau didn't get much on a backhand effort, but he didn't need to do so. His slow shot deflected off the stick of Kings defenseman Slava Voynov at 6 minutes 20 seconds of overtime past goalie Jonathan Quick, giving San Jose a 4-3 win over the Kings in Game 3 of their Western Conference quarterfinal playoff series Tuesday night at Staples Center.
SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
WASHINGTON  - It was a majestic blast, exploding off the bat as if shot from a cannon, and as the ball arced its way toward the outer reaches of Nationals Park, it looked as if it might put a dent in the Capitol dome beyond the left-field wall. Albert Pujols doesn't hit many cheap home runs, and there was no doubt the shot the Angels slugger launched in the fifth inning of Tuesday night's 7-2 win over the Washington Nationals would make history. Some 18,000 men have played major league baseball since 1876, and only 26 of them have hit 500 home runs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In terms of mythology, it was Bonnie Parker who turned a small band of murderous thugs led by Clyde Barrow into the stuff of legend. Even as the Depression-era gang went on its murderous two-year crime spree, the idea of a female outlaw titillated a nation already prone to romanticizing criminals amid a failing economic system. When she and her lover died in a hail of gunfire, and photos of her posing with firearms and a getaway car were discovered, Bonnie became the pin-up girl for the hyper-sexualized archetype of the gun moll.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010
The director Cameron Jamie has a sharp eye for the cryptic weirdness in everyday American and European life. At this screening, the new film "Massage the History" makes its L.A. debut alongside Jamie's trilogy of "BB," "Kranky Klaus" and "Spook House" that find the uncanny in suburban and urban life when we think nobody's looking. Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 7 p.m. Thur. Free. hammer.ucla.edu .
SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
Resoundingly and emphatically, the Clippers responded to the challenge presented to them in Game 2 of their Western Conference first-round playoff series by winning in historic fashion Monday night at Staples Center. Blake Griffin answered the call with a playoff career-high 35 points. And Doc Rivers coached his team with a purpose while mixing it up with one of his former players. Griffin's 35-point night, in just three quarters of play, was the impetus behind the Clippers' 138-98 rout of the Golden State Warriors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Are you psycho for "Bates Motel" but lost without cable? Cheer up, lil' Internet TV viewer. A&E Networks announced on Monday that it has launched A&E, History and Lifetime content on Apple TV. That means more than just "Bates Motel"; it includes popular shows like "Storage Wars," "Project Runway," "Devious Maids" and "Pawn Stars. " Apple TV launched in early 2007 and offered a novel way to watch content from the Internet on a regular HDTV. The latest third-generation model was released in 2013.
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