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FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1996 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In urban transit, no less than life, what goes around comes around--eventually. Consider, for example, that icon of futuristic mass transit, the monorail. Long a staple of science fiction novels and the virtual symbol of Disneyland's popular Tomorrowland, the elevated bullet train is once again a hot topic in Los Angeles' turbulent transit circles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2012 | Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
Glen Creason is used to waiting at the downtown Central Library. At the reference desk in a large space four floors below 5th Street, he knows the questions will come. They always do. "There was a baseball field somewhere in L.A. in 1888 that only lasted one year. Where was it exactly?" "How do I find the gravel pit where the Sleepy Lagoon murder took place?" Creason has heard it all. "One I get constantly is, 'Do you have maps of the secret tunnels dug under L.A.?' .... They are secret tunnels and they do not appear on maps," he says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal bankruptcy judge approved the sale of the historic Ambassador Hotel and its sprawling grounds to the Los Angeles Unified School District on Wednesday after a deal with a rival bidder fell apart at the last minute. Just one day earlier, Judge Samuel L. Bufford had signaled his willingness to authorize sale of the 23.5-acre site to Beverly Hills developer Alan Casden, who offered $115 million for the property, about $15 million more than the school district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Andrew Blankstein and Cara Mia DiMassa
A mammoth forest fire that killed two firefighters and has burned more than 147,000 acres was an act of arson, authorities said Thursday as they launched a homicide investigation into the deaths. Officials said they determined that the largest brush fire in the history of Los Angeles County was the result of arson after investigators examined forensic evidence from scorched landscape off Angeles Crest Highway, north of La Cañada Flintridge. The spot is believed to be the source of origin of the Station fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Into the West Into the West with the setting sun Winged the avions, one by one; Argonauts of the azure skies, Leaping the sea for a golden prize . . . --Addison N. Clark, 1927 In August 1927, three months after Lucky Lindy flew solo and nonstop across the Atlantic, buoying the spirits of aviation enthusiasts, there came an air disaster that almost set back the flying boom.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | JUDITH JACOVITZ
When California was admitted to the Union in 1850, it has been reported that there were eight Jews living in Los Angeles. Nearly a century and a half later, that population has proliferated, with growth and contributions evidenced by the many historic sites around the city. Some are no longer in use; others have become homes for different faiths, nationalities or professions. Several landmarks have been designated historical buildings by the Cultural Heritage Board of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2012 | Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
Glen Creason is used to waiting at the downtown Central Library. At the reference desk in a large space four floors below 5th Street, he knows the questions will come. They always do. "There was a baseball field somewhere in L.A. in 1888 that only lasted one year. Where was it exactly?" "How do I find the gravel pit where the Sleepy Lagoon murder took place?" Creason has heard it all. "One I get constantly is, 'Do you have maps of the secret tunnels dug under L.A.?' .... They are secret tunnels and they do not appear on maps," he says.
BOOKS
June 7, 1987 | David Gebhard, Gebhard is the co-author of "A Complete Guide to Architecture in Los Angeles." (1985)
Angelenos and others who have read the Los Angeles Times over the last half-dozen years or so are familiar with the writing of Sam Hall Kaplan, the design critic of that newspaper. His critical writings for The Times have again and again appreciably expanded our awareness of Los Angeles' architecture and of historic preservation by his continual insistence that we must look, react, and judge with a broad picture of this planned, unplanned environment always in mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | RAY LOYND
It's a curious fact that in Chinese chess there's no queen. To Shanghai-born and Hong Kong-bred Los Angeles visual artist May Sun, the omission is culturally symbolic and she has corrected it with a vengeance. In "The Chinese Chess Piece," a curated festival performance work debuting Thursday on a giant chess board of a set on the floor of the gymnasium of the Hollywood Methodist Church, there's not a bishop or king in sight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992 | KENNETH J. GARCIA and SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A wealthy Century City physician, who pleaded guilty to 25 felony fraud and theft charges after bilking insurance carriers of up to $8 million, claimed he was stressed out after his indictments and has been receiving $266 a week in state disability payments. On Thursday, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner said Dr. Gershon W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal bankruptcy judge approved the sale of the historic Ambassador Hotel and its sprawling grounds to the Los Angeles Unified School District on Wednesday after a deal with a rival bidder fell apart at the last minute. Just one day earlier, Judge Samuel L. Bufford had signaled his willingness to authorize sale of the 23.5-acre site to Beverly Hills developer Alan Casden, who offered $115 million for the property, about $15 million more than the school district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Into the West Into the West with the setting sun Winged the avions, one by one; Argonauts of the azure skies, Leaping the sea for a golden prize . . . --Addison N. Clark, 1927 In August 1927, three months after Lucky Lindy flew solo and nonstop across the Atlantic, buoying the spirits of aviation enthusiasts, there came an air disaster that almost set back the flying boom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1996 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In urban transit, no less than life, what goes around comes around--eventually. Consider, for example, that icon of futuristic mass transit, the monorail. Long a staple of science fiction novels and the virtual symbol of Disneyland's popular Tomorrowland, the elevated bullet train is once again a hot topic in Los Angeles' turbulent transit circles.
BOOKS
February 7, 1993 | Stanley O. Williford
This book is as much a paean to Central Avenue in the '30s, '40s and '50s as to black music and the many heralded and unheralded black musicians and entertainers. Author Tom Reed writes: "Central Avenue, the street of dreams, the hub, smoke-filled rooms, after-hours joints, jazz and blues, the gathering place of the black bourgeoisie, dance halls, theaters, nite clubs, filled with women, illegal booze, service personnel and illegal gambling." A former disc jockey, Reed gathered and collated hundreds of publicity stills, posters, fliers, ads and clippings from various collections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury rendered its final verdicts Friday in the longest criminal trial in the history of the Los Angeles federal courthouse by convicting a Sylmar man of participating in a ring that laundered $350 million through the downtown Los Angeles jewelry district. But a mistrial was declared on a charge that he and four other defendants conspired to aid and abet drug distribution. Ruben Saini, 43, of Sylmar was convicted of 22 felony counts of money laundering and one count of conspiracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | RAY LOYND
It's a curious fact that in Chinese chess there's no queen. To Shanghai-born and Hong Kong-bred Los Angeles visual artist May Sun, the omission is culturally symbolic and she has corrected it with a vengeance. In "The Chinese Chess Piece," a curated festival performance work debuting Thursday on a giant chess board of a set on the floor of the gymnasium of the Hollywood Methodist Church, there's not a bishop or king in sight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Andrew Blankstein and Cara Mia DiMassa
A mammoth forest fire that killed two firefighters and has burned more than 147,000 acres was an act of arson, authorities said Thursday as they launched a homicide investigation into the deaths. Officials said they determined that the largest brush fire in the history of Los Angeles County was the result of arson after investigators examined forensic evidence from scorched landscape off Angeles Crest Highway, north of La Cañada Flintridge. The spot is believed to be the source of origin of the Station fire.
BOOKS
February 7, 1993 | Stanley O. Williford
This book is as much a paean to Central Avenue in the '30s, '40s and '50s as to black music and the many heralded and unheralded black musicians and entertainers. Author Tom Reed writes: "Central Avenue, the street of dreams, the hub, smoke-filled rooms, after-hours joints, jazz and blues, the gathering place of the black bourgeoisie, dance halls, theaters, nite clubs, filled with women, illegal booze, service personnel and illegal gambling." A former disc jockey, Reed gathered and collated hundreds of publicity stills, posters, fliers, ads and clippings from various collections.
BOOKS
June 7, 1987 | David Gebhard, Gebhard is the co-author of "A Complete Guide to Architecture in Los Angeles." (1985)
Angelenos and others who have read the Los Angeles Times over the last half-dozen years or so are familiar with the writing of Sam Hall Kaplan, the design critic of that newspaper. His critical writings for The Times have again and again appreciably expanded our awareness of Los Angeles' architecture and of historic preservation by his continual insistence that we must look, react, and judge with a broad picture of this planned, unplanned environment always in mind.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | JUDITH JACOVITZ
When California was admitted to the Union in 1850, it has been reported that there were eight Jews living in Los Angeles. Nearly a century and a half later, that population has proliferated, with growth and contributions evidenced by the many historic sites around the city. Some are no longer in use; others have become homes for different faiths, nationalities or professions. Several landmarks have been designated historical buildings by the Cultural Heritage Board of Los Angeles.
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