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July 3, 1996 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after the invention of photography came stereographs--twin black-and-white images that, when seen through a special viewer, fused into one three-dimensional scene. It was a simple technique but an overwhelmingly popular one, and stereo viewers were common in middle-class American homes by the late 1800s. Things have come a long way since then, of course.
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August 15, 1999 | TOM VANDERBILT, Tom Vanderbilt is a contributing editor to I.D. and The Baffler and has written for Metropolis, Preservation and Harvard Design Magazine. He is the author of "The Sneaker Book: Anatomy of an Industry and an Icon" (New Press)
As a city predicated on novelty--not once but twice--New York, nee Nieuw Amsterdam, has understandably played a rather anxious host to history. The favored mythos is of a convulsively rejuvenating metropolis, feeding on the flow of money, goods, information and the talent and spirit of the young, always fixed on the arrival of the next ship, the next season, the next artistic movement.
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BOOKS
August 15, 1999 | TOM VANDERBILT, Tom Vanderbilt is a contributing editor to I.D. and The Baffler and has written for Metropolis, Preservation and Harvard Design Magazine. He is the author of "The Sneaker Book: Anatomy of an Industry and an Icon" (New Press)
As a city predicated on novelty--not once but twice--New York, nee Nieuw Amsterdam, has understandably played a rather anxious host to history. The favored mythos is of a convulsively rejuvenating metropolis, feeding on the flow of money, goods, information and the talent and spirit of the young, always fixed on the arrival of the next ship, the next season, the next artistic movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1996 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long after the invention of photography came stereographs--twin black-and-white images that, when seen through a special viewer, fused into one three-dimensional scene. It was a simple technique but an overwhelmingly popular one, and stereo viewers were common in middle-class American homes by the late 1800s. Things have come a long way since then, of course.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The New York Stock Exchange, that bastion of capitalism, agreed Tuesday to stay in New York City--thanks to the largest government subsidy in New York history. New York City and the state will spend about $400 million on a new trading complex across the street from the NYSE's current headquarters. The exchange, long wooed by surrounding states, also will get $160 million in tax waivers. As part of the plan, a developer will build an office tower above a planned 650,000-square-foot trading floor.
TRAVEL
May 31, 1998
A 90-foot-long diorama of an African rain forest is the highlight of the 11,000-square-foot Hall of Biodiversity that opened this weekend at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The diorama uses video, sound and light to show the forest in three states: pristine, altered by natural forces, and degraded by human intervention. The hall also portrays evolution, using more than 1,500 specimens and models, and gives updates on fires and other environmental events.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Don't Try This on a Hot Day Dept.: Ten Tibetan monks are involved in a monthlong project at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City that dates back six centuries--butter sculpture. The figures taking shape in an unheated hall are intricate, brightly colored religious offerings, created in a ritualistic manner. The monks, from the Gyuto Tantric Monastery in Bomdila, India, rise before dawn to chant for hours, then work on the sculptures from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
CBS has announced mid-season dates for the premiere of its new drama "Golden Boy" and the seventh-season return of "Rules of Engagement. " "Golden Boy," which stars Theo James as an ambitious cop who becomes the youngest police commissioner in the history of New York City, will air with two previews on Feb. 26 and March 5 -- both at 10 p.m. -- before moving to its regular Friday at 10 p.m. slot on March 8. "Rules of Engagement" will return on...
TRAVEL
June 9, 1996
The American Museum of Natural History in New York City this weekend opens what organizers are calling the single largest and most diverse array of vertebrate fossils in the world. More than 600 specimens--including the Buettneria, one of the early four-limbed vertebrates that lived in North America (pictured left)--are on view in the six halls that make up the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Orientation Center and the Hall of Vertebrate Origins.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1999
Seismic California is a leading player at the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth, opened this weekend at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. A cast of scarp formed in the 1992 Landers shaker is in the earthquake section, where you can also create your own seismograph signal with a good jump.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Frederick H. Pough, 99, a museum curator and mineralogist who wrote the definitive guide to collecting gems and minerals, died April 7 of a heart attack near his home in Pittsford, N.Y. In 1953, Pough wrote "A Field Guide to Rocks and Minerals" while serving as curator of physical geology and mineralogy at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. The guide used photographs and simple prose to identify hundreds of minerals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2002
Bruce Bliven Jr., 85, an author whose books range from a history of the typewriter to Washington's fight with the redcoats in New York City, died Jan. 2 of undisclosed causes in his Manhattan home. The Los Angeles-born writer, who moved to the Bronx when he was 17 months old, wrote three books about the history of New York City, including the "The Story of the World's Most Exciting City" for young adults.
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