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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Are you psycho for "Bates Motel" but lost without cable? Cheer up, lil' Internet TV viewer. A&E Networks announced on Monday that it has launched A&E, History and Lifetime content on Apple TV. That means more than just "Bates Motel"; it includes popular shows like "Storage Wars," "Project Runway," "Devious Maids" and "Pawn Stars. " Apple TV launched in early 2007 and offered a novel way to watch content from the Internet on a regular HDTV. The latest third-generation model was released in 2013.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Peaches Geldof, a British model, TV personality and writer, was laid to rest Monday in southern England in a brightly decorated casket that on one side reflected her life as a wife and mother of two.  Family and friends attended the private funeral, with famous faces including Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, models Kate Moss and Alexa Chung, musicians Jools Holland and former Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman, and BBC1 TV presenter Nick Grimshaw...
TRAVEL
April 20, 2014
Mixed views on Charleston I'm glad Alice Short highlighted the most troubling aspect of visiting Charleston, S.C., in her cover article ["In a New Light," April 13]. What is on the surface one of America's finest historic towns was built and maintained by enslaved African Americans whose history is mostly hidden and unspoken, while the Confederate past is celebrated. The only thing that "saved" our stay in Charleston was Alphonso Brown's wonderful Gullah Tour ( www.gullahtours.com )
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
It's hard to believe that only 50 years have passed since Julia Child set foot on the new continent of American Foodlandia. And yet in that short period, it seems we've already seen the full cycle of colonial development: discovery, exploration, exploitation. Three books on recent food history offer glimpses of each stage. Luke Barr's "Provence, 1970" describes the beginning; Colman Andrews' "My Usual Table" hits the middle period; and Allen Salkin's "From Scratch," a pulp history of the Food Network, covers the descent into decadence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
It didn't last long, but for a short time in the 1840s the Mississippi River town of Nauvoo was the largest city in Illinois. While most municipalities thrived on trade, Nauvoo's propelling force was something much less tangible: faith. And that would also be the city's downfall. Before the fledgling Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints - the Mormons - made Salt Lake City the center of their earthly existence, they had settled in Nauvoo, following their founding prophet Joseph Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
When David Crosby wrote “Déjà Vu,” the song that would become the title track for the 1970 debut by rock supergroup Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, it was a meditation on recurrence. When Crosby sang on stage Monday night at the Troubadour in West Hollywood, the song's recurring refrain “And I feel like I've been here before,” it was personal memory, plain and simple. Crosby is one of many important rock figures who got their start on the Troubadour's stage, and for him that was nearly a half century ago. “The Byrds -- right there,” he said, pointing to the stage from his perch on anupstairs sofa between sets at the second of five sold-out solo shows this week at the venerable club.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON -- After a grueling 48-hour drive from Montana, the capital's latest transplant -- a 38-foot long, 66 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton -- got to rest its bones Tuesday at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. The Smithsonian's newest acquisition is one of the largest and most complete specimens in the world, and it will be the museum's first real T. rex skeleton on display. “What could be more fabulous than welcoming a Tyrannosaurus rex to Washington D.C.?
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | Helene Elliott
Were those tears or drops of sweat rolling down Teemu Selanne's face Sunday as he skated around the Honda Center, absorbing and returning the crowd's love after the final regular-season game of his Hall of Fame career? If he wept, he wasn't alone. Selanne's love for Southern California was mutual from the day he joined the Ducks in February 1996, traded here by the financially strapped Winnipeg Jets. One sunny breakfast under palm trees, and he was home. "This is my kind of place," he recalled thinking.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Matt Pearce
AURORA, Mo. - The elderly man was well known in this slightly faded farm town for his failed attempts at elective office, his libertarian leanings, his Southern charm. But Frazier Glenn Cross, 73, who also went by the name of Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., was known even more for his white supremacist beliefs that led him to try to incite a race war, pepper local papers with anti-immigrant letters and get into a shouting match with a Jewish student at Missouri State University. Police arrested Cross on Sunday on suspicion of shooting and killing a 14-year-old Boy Scout and his grandfather at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City in Overland Park, Kan., and a woman at a nearby Jewish assisted living center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
STRATFORD-UPON-AVON, England - The history play, that genre that at its best transcends the oft-quoted line in Shakespeare's "Richard II" - "let us sit upon the ground, And tell sad stories of the death of kings" - is making a striking comeback in Britain. The hottest theatrical offering in recent months has been a two-part, six-hour dramatization of the political machinations of Henry VIII's court. The Royal Shakespeare Company production of "Wolf Hall" and "Bring Up the Bodies," adapted from Hilary Mantel's Booker Prize-winning novels by Mike Poulton, returns us to 16th century England, with the slippery political operator Thomas Cromwell getting a fairer-than-usual shake in this dynamic retelling.
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