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Hitler And Stalin

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OPINION
July 30, 2010 | By Abraham Cooper
First, full disclosure: I am the Left Coast representative of the Jewish conspiratorial lobby that Oliver Stone was fretting over in his recent interview with London's Sunday Times. You know, the Jews, whose "domination of the media" prevent Hitler and Stalin from being portrayed "in context." It seems the once and future wunderkind was also frustrated that no one understands that it was the Russians who were damaged more than the Jews during World War II. I think he had the score of 25 million or 30 million to 6 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2010 | By Richard Schickel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Dangerous Otto Katz The Many Lives of a Soviet Spy Jonathan Miles Bloomsbury: 366 pp., $26 He had at least 21 aliases. He insisted that he was briefly Marlene Dietrich's husband in 1920s Berlin, which was probably not so, though he was possibly her lover. He was definitely the model for the leading character in Lillian Hellman's successful play (and film) "Watch on the Rhine," but not, I think, the inspiration for " Casablanca's" Victor Laszlo, much as the publisher of this book might wish it so. That said, he seems to have known everyone over the course of a world-traveling public career as a left-wing journalist and author and a more hidden (but not entirely unknown)
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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | United Press International
The United States today compared Cuba's Fidel Castro to Adolf Hitler and Josef Stalin and demanded an investigation by a U.N. commission into alleged violations of freedoms by Cuba. Ambassador Vernon Walters, permanent U.S. representative to the United Nations, told the annual meeting of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights: "I am old enough to remember those who apologized for Hitler and Stalin.
OPINION
July 30, 2010 | By Abraham Cooper
First, full disclosure: I am the Left Coast representative of the Jewish conspiratorial lobby that Oliver Stone was fretting over in his recent interview with London's Sunday Times. You know, the Jews, whose "domination of the media" prevent Hitler and Stalin from being portrayed "in context." It seems the once and future wunderkind was also frustrated that no one understands that it was the Russians who were damaged more than the Jews during World War II. I think he had the score of 25 million or 30 million to 6 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990
The Berlin Wall has fallen. The nations of Eastern Europe are clamoring for freedom. Lithuania has declared independence. Soviet citizens are voting in free elections. Nelson Mandela is free. Apartheid is doomed. And Buckley is urging that Israel annex the West Bank and Gaza Strip, a la South Africa, Hitler and Stalin. Perhaps Buckley would like to join the nearly 2 million Palestinians who will be "guests of the government of Israel," enjoying a "wonderfully refreshing" Israeli policy that denies them the right to vote, assemble, express themselves, or live in peace in their own homeland.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1989
McKenna's article on Haacke was flimflam. Although she takes great pains to quote at length the artist, his dealer and his curator, only six words are heard from other points of view. As a long-time advocate of many of the causes that Haacke champions, I can only say that he and apologist McKenna give the rest of us a bad name. Thanks to Hitler and Stalin, so-called art devoted to purely political purposes is deservedly out of favor in this country. Calling simplistic propaganda "fine art" does not make it such, no matter how enthusiastic the propagandist's dealer may be about his work, or how much some are willing to pay for it. Poster art belongs on telephone poles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996
Cal Thomas and Julian Lieb (Commentary, Feb. 16) are out of their element in their treatment of religious phenomena. Thomas implies that Hopi religion is the worship of plants and animals, or "animism." He also mocks Bruce Babbitt's return to Catholicism. "Animism" is a discredited category. Western anthropologists mistakenly thought that indigenous peoples believed rocks, trees, animals or celestial bodies were divine. In fact, all religions use symbols that point to invisible realities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1986
Weschler's article is a fine appeal to the conscience of the nation to support Medal of Honor Charles Liteky's protest against our war in Nicaragua. But he cites a "truism" that Gandhian nonviolence works only if the surrounding society evinces a minimal level of public conscience (as the British did) that might be pricked by the nonviolent spectacle." A truism in my dictionary is a self-evident truth. And I don't think that statement is at all self-evident to advocates of non-violence in the Gandhian or other traditions.
OPINION
January 17, 1988
Podhoretz makes fun of Brodsky for his remark that if leaders were selected on the basis of their reading experience and not political prowess, the earth would be a better place. Podhoretz is missing Brodsky's point. Brodsky is simply saying that if one is able to read the classics then conversely one can think. The more experiences (real and literary) from which a leader can draw, the better the chances for higher level cognitive solutions to problems. The key to Brodsky's assertion is reading begets thinking; and while aesthetics and literature are the foundation that great leadership should embrace, Brodsky would not limit potential greatness with these two ingredients alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1990
I have just read the letter from Clark Hepworth that decries the state of the nation and ominously foresees the imminent destruction of democracy itself. Why? Why, due to the single-handed efforts of Rep. Dana Rohrabacher to implement some limitations in the National Endowment of the Arts grants, of course. (For which, in a segue of logic that reveals Hepworth's own remarkable gift for creativity, he succeeds in equating Rohrabacher with Hitler and Stalin.) Why, I wonder yet again, does Hepworth and others of his view have such difficulty in distinguishing the difference between censorship and sponsorship?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Thomas McGonigle
In 1940, Helsinki received an unexpected visitor: Bertolt Brecht. Eventually to be known as the most famous German playwright after Goethe, Brecht was also a committed communist on the run from the Nazis, believing that Hitler personally wanted him dead. The picture of Brecht's arrival in Finland is almost comical: He arrived with his wife, his mistress, his children and 26 bags of luggage.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | ANWAR FARUQI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From time to time, the lone caretaker at the dreary cemetery gets a letter from abroad asking him to light a candle at one of the hundreds of identical headstones at the far end of the walled, unmarked graveyard. A forgotten chapter of World War II is buried in this Roman Catholic cemetery in a poor neighborhood of Tehran. Occasional candles are the only flickers of remembrance for these 1,892 Polish men, women and children far from home and for the calamity that befell them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996
Cal Thomas and Julian Lieb (Commentary, Feb. 16) are out of their element in their treatment of religious phenomena. Thomas implies that Hopi religion is the worship of plants and animals, or "animism." He also mocks Bruce Babbitt's return to Catholicism. "Animism" is a discredited category. Western anthropologists mistakenly thought that indigenous peoples believed rocks, trees, animals or celestial bodies were divine. In fact, all religions use symbols that point to invisible realities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1993
The front-page article "Troopers Say Clinton Sought Silence on Personal Affairs" (Dec. 21) was incredible. What really struck me was the statement that there exists "a widening belief that personal character may be as important to a leader's performance as political party or ideology." This is a widening belief? I thought that a free and moral society sought personal character as the foundation of a great leader. Was it not a lack of personal character combined with political ideologies that led to the greatest atrocities of the 20th Century enacted by Hitler and Stalin?
BOOKS
March 29, 1992 | David Cannadine, Cannadine is professor of history at Columbia University, and is the author, most recently, of "The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy."
In the long, sad cavalcade of history's most wicked men, Hitler and Stalin seem unrivaled as the most effectively and influentially evil. As individuals, they may have been no more ruthless, no more vengeful, no more amoral, no more megalomaniacal than Attila the Hun or Genghis Kahn. But the fact that they lived in the 20th Century rather than the 5th or the 12th meant they possessed the means to do a great deal more harm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1990
I have just read the letter from Clark Hepworth that decries the state of the nation and ominously foresees the imminent destruction of democracy itself. Why? Why, due to the single-handed efforts of Rep. Dana Rohrabacher to implement some limitations in the National Endowment of the Arts grants, of course. (For which, in a segue of logic that reveals Hepworth's own remarkable gift for creativity, he succeeds in equating Rohrabacher with Hitler and Stalin.) Why, I wonder yet again, does Hepworth and others of his view have such difficulty in distinguishing the difference between censorship and sponsorship?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009 | Thomas McGonigle
In 1940, Helsinki received an unexpected visitor: Bertolt Brecht. Eventually to be known as the most famous German playwright after Goethe, Brecht was also a committed communist on the run from the Nazis, believing that Hitler personally wanted him dead. The picture of Brecht's arrival in Finland is almost comical: He arrived with his wife, his mistress, his children and 26 bags of luggage.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | JACK SMITH
I continue to be chastised for questioning the validity and value of a vogue form of literary criticism known as deconstruction. I do not understand deconstruction, as I admitted; but I infer, from what I have read, that it reduces texts to ambiguity or meaninglessness. In the end, the word is master of the man. It was born in France, but now seems to be entrenched in American higher education, especially at UC Irvine and Occidental College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990
The Berlin Wall has fallen. The nations of Eastern Europe are clamoring for freedom. Lithuania has declared independence. Soviet citizens are voting in free elections. Nelson Mandela is free. Apartheid is doomed. And Buckley is urging that Israel annex the West Bank and Gaza Strip, a la South Africa, Hitler and Stalin. Perhaps Buckley would like to join the nearly 2 million Palestinians who will be "guests of the government of Israel," enjoying a "wonderfully refreshing" Israeli policy that denies them the right to vote, assemble, express themselves, or live in peace in their own homeland.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | JACK SMITH
I continue to be chastised for questioning the validity and value of a vogue form of literary criticism known as deconstruction. I do not understand deconstruction, as I admitted; but I infer, from what I have read, that it reduces texts to ambiguity or meaninglessness. In the end, the word is master of the man. It was born in France, but now seems to be entrenched in American higher education, especially at UC Irvine and Occidental College.
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