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Hiwire Inc

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BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clear Channel Communications Inc., the nation's largest radio station owner, which in April shut down most of its Internet operations in the face of growing legal and financial barriers, plans to return 250 stations to the Internet beginning in July. In a deal to be announced today, Clear Channel will sign an exclusive agreement with Hiwire Inc. to strip out commercials heard by the chain's radio listeners and replace them with new spots designed specifically for the Internet.
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BUSINESS
June 18, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clear Channel Communications Inc., the nation's largest radio station owner, which in April shut down most of its Internet operations in the face of growing legal and financial barriers, plans to return 250 stations to the Internet beginning in July. In a deal to be announced today, Clear Channel will sign an exclusive agreement with Hiwire Inc. to strip out commercials heard by the chain's radio listeners and replace them with new spots designed specifically for the Internet.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 2000
* Oakland-based law firm Crosby, Heafey, Roach & May signed a 10-year, $15-million lease for 60,000 square feet of office space at Wells Fargo Center at 333 S. Grand Ave. in downtown Los Angeles, according to Stephen L. Bay and Clay Hammerstein of Insignia/ESG, who represented the law firm in lease negotiations. The landlord, Maguire Partners, was represented in-house by Tony Morales and Josh Wrobel.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2000 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't get any more button-down than inside 333 South Grand Ave., a sleek downtown Los Angeles skyscraper populated with bankers, lawyers and consultants. But in the new fourth-floor offices of Hiwire Inc., an Internet services firm, there's not a pinstripe in sight.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't enough for them to spit in the face of corporate seniority (Colossal stock options for everyone!), of stuffy dress codes. (Just dressing is good enough for them.) They don't stop, this digital crowd, forever upending workplace culture in their land of the freewheeling, home of the unconventional. Now they must zip around in a way that is different from you and me. A low-tech way, really, and the irony suits them.
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