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Hmo California

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BUSINESS
December 15, 1994
HMO California said Wednesday that it has agreed to be acquired by Employers Health Insurance Co., a unit of Emphesys Financial Group Inc. of Green Bay, Wis. Terms of the purchase by Employers Health, the nation's 10th-largest group health insurance company, were not disclosed. HMO California, a privately held company based in Newport Beach, has customers in Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., which operates the nation's largest managed-care plan for people on Medicare, said Wednesday that it will lay off 250 people--about 3% of its work force--over the next year as it strives to cut costs and improve efficiency. An additional 200 positions will be lost through attrition.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Humana Inc. will sell its HMO California business to HealthMax Inc. as part of its drive to jettison units that don't have significant market share. HMO California, which operates in four Southern California counties, has fewer than 10,000 members and represents a small portion of Humana's California business, the company said. Terms of the sale to closely held HealthMax weren't disclosed. The agreement is subject to state regulatory approval. Louisville, Ky.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1998 | Barbara Marsh
Goodbye, HMO California. Hello, HealthMax? HMO California--a loss-ridden health plan with 10,000 members--seeks success under new ownership and the new name, HealthMax America. Founded by local doctors about 10 years ago, HMO California was acquired by health care giant Humana Inc. three years ago, then spun off as a company to a private doctors' group last November. Dr. David L. Tsoong, its new chief executive and an owner, says the HMO California name was "too generic."
BUSINESS
February 5, 1998 | Barbara Marsh
Goodbye, HMO California. Hello, HealthMax? HMO California--a loss-ridden health plan with 10,000 members--seeks success under new ownership and the new name, HealthMax America. Founded by local doctors about 10 years ago, HMO California was acquired by health care giant Humana Inc. three years ago, then spun off as a company to a private doctors' group last November. Dr. David L. Tsoong, its new chief executive and an owner, says the HMO California name was "too generic."
BUSINESS
January 13, 2000 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., which operates the nation's largest managed-care plan for people on Medicare, said Wednesday that it will lay off 250 people--about 3% of its work force--over the next year as it strives to cut costs and improve efficiency. An additional 200 positions will be lost through attrition.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Doctors Mull Forming HMO: The California Medical Assn., a professional group representing 37,000 doctors, is in talks with Wausau Insurance Cos., of Wausau, Wisc., about forming a statewide physician-run health maintenance organization. CMA spokesman Paul Moreno said there is widespread dissatisfaction among doctors about the growing influence that for-profit HMOs and other managed care companies are having on their professional lives.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
Debt-ridden Maxicare Health Plans Inc., a major provider of health coverage serving 1 million Americans in a dozen states, filed today in Santa Ana for bankruptcy court protection and indicated that it will sell its HMO serving California. The company, which operates under the names Maxicare, HealthCare USA and HealthAmerica, announced that it sought protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a possible end to a bitter labor dispute, Kaiser Permanente and thousands of registered nurses in Northern California reached a tentative contract agreement Wednesday. The accord calls for a 12% pay hike over four years and gives nurses a new watchdog role over quality of patient care at the nation's largest HMO, said Rose Ann DeMoro, executive director of the California Nurses Assn.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Humana Inc. will sell its HMO California business to HealthMax Inc. as part of its drive to jettison units that don't have significant market share. HMO California, which operates in four Southern California counties, has fewer than 10,000 members and represents a small portion of Humana's California business, the company said. Terms of the sale to closely held HealthMax weren't disclosed. The agreement is subject to state regulatory approval. Louisville, Ky.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1994
HMO California said Wednesday that it has agreed to be acquired by Employers Health Insurance Co., a unit of Emphesys Financial Group Inc. of Green Bay, Wis. Terms of the purchase by Employers Health, the nation's 10th-largest group health insurance company, were not disclosed. HMO California, a privately held company based in Newport Beach, has customers in Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2000 | Associated Press
Blue Shield of California will be licensed by the state to provide health services to employees on both sides of the Mexican border. Gov. Gray Davis made the announcement during opening ceremonies for the 18th annual Border Governors Conference in Sacramento. An estimated 40,000 to 50,000 Mexicans cross the border each day to work legally in the San Diego area.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1994 | James M. Gomez, Times staff writer
The day of reckoning is approaching for executives of FHP International Inc., the Fountain Valley health maintenance organization, and its Northern California competitor, TakeCare Inc. The two companies have announced an ambitious $1-billion plan to merge, creating the third-largest HMO in California and the fifth-largest in the nation. But before the deal can close, shareholders of both companies must weigh in with their votes on whether it should proceed.
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