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Hmong Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeka Wong Yang, 22, wore a delicate black velvet pantsuit, trimmed with hand-embroidered sashes flashing shades of bubble gum pink, lime green and deep violet. Her ornate dress, a 5-pound silver neckpiece and the dozens of coins that jingled from her neck signified that she was unmarried. On Friday, she joined scores of other young women and men, boys and girls in similar dress at the second annual Hmong New Year's Celebration at Rancho Santiago College in Santa Ana.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1996 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeka Wong Yang, 22, wore a delicate black velvet pantsuit, trimmed with hand-embroidered sashes flashing shades of bubble gum pink, lime green and deep violet. Her ornate dress, a 5-pound silver neckpiece and the dozens of coins that jingled from her neck signified that she was unmarried. On Friday, she joined scores of other young women and men, boys and girls in similar dress at the second annual Hmong New Year's Celebration at Rancho Santiago College in Santa Ana.
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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years and a lifetime ago, Chue Chang stole his Hmong bride from her parents' home in the highlands of Laos. Her father would not consent to their marriage, so in keeping with Hmong custom, Chang, aided by friends and relatives, spirited her away. "Once the (would-be) father-in-law says no, then you must take her," explained their son, 20-year-old John Chang. "Then you arrange everything later."
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years and a lifetime ago, Chue Chang stole his Hmong bride from her parents' home in the highlands of Laos. Her father would not consent to their marriage, so in keeping with Hmong custom, Chang, aided by friends and relatives, spirited her away. "Once the (would-be) father-in-law says no, then you must take her," explained their son, 20-year-old John Chang. "Then you arrange everything later."
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