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Hoag Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1988 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
Members of a Bel-Air homeowners association and the developer of a $250-million residential site struck an unusual deal Wednesday that will require the development firm to rebuild part of a mountain ridge that it lopped off without any notice to area homeowners. The ridge at the top of Hoag Canyon, considered one of the most pristine sections of the Santa Monica Mountains, was shaved down by about 200 feet during the past year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1988 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
Members of a Bel-Air homeowners association and the developer of a $250-million residential site struck an unusual deal Wednesday that will require the development firm to rebuild part of a mountain ridge that it lopped off without any notice to area homeowners. The ridge at the top of Hoag Canyon, considered one of the most pristine sections of the Santa Monica Mountains, was shaved down by about 200 feet during the past year.
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NEWS
June 18, 1987 | WILLIAM G. QUINN
It wasn't a day for amateurs. The sixth annual Invitational Stag Shoot staged in Trabuco Canyon by 552 Club, a support group for Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, saw 160 participants sighting their clay pigeons with keen, competitive eyes. "Some of these guys have been practicing all year for this," said Bruce Lawrence, aiming his shotgun to shatter two clay pigeons. "It's getting to be highly competitive."
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | WILLIAM G. QUINN
It wasn't a day for amateurs. The sixth annual Invitational Stag Shoot staged in Trabuco Canyon by 552 Club, a support group for Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, saw 160 participants sighting their clay pigeons with keen, competitive eyes. "Some of these guys have been practicing all year for this," said Bruce Lawrence, aiming his shotgun to shatter two clay pigeons. "It's getting to be highly competitive."
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, Times Staff Writer
Long before the bulldozers began their march along the hillside and the daily drone of the grading equipment filled the air, Hoag Canyon in Bel-Air served as a natural barrier to the encroaching developments of the outside world.
REAL ESTATE
July 10, 1988 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
No camp-outs are planned for the building sites and custom homes at Bel Air Crest in the Santa Monica Mountains, but it won't be for lack of demand, according to Bruce Froehlich. Such activity wouldn't be fitting for a development where lots sell from about $550,000 to more than $1 million, he said. Froehlich is director of housing for the Prestige Homes unit of the developer, Goldrich & Kest Industries, Culver City.
REAL ESTATE
June 25, 1989
Bel Air Crest will open Wednesday in the Santa Monica Mountains, the first new subdivision in Bel-Air in decades and a development that was more than a dozen years in planning and construction. The $300-million project south of the Mulholland ridge dividing the Westside of Los Angeles from the San Fernando Valley opens with six model homes priced from $785,000 to $1.4 million, according to a spokeswoman for Goldrich & Kest Industries, the Culver City-based developers. Designed by McLarand Vasquez & Partners, the Canyon Home models have 2,367 to 4,521 square feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2012 | By Joseph Serna and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
A fast-moving brush fire in the Sepulveda Pass that snarled traffic across the Westside and sent jitters through Bel-Air canyon neighborhoods burned through the night Friday, forcing crews to prepare for a second day of battle in record-breaking heat. The Getty fire started in high brush on the east side of the 405 Freeway near Getty Center Drive during the afternoon rush hour and raced through 70 acres of hillside scrub toward the canyons of Bel-Air. It prompted the voluntary evacuation of the Getty Center, and brought an already congested traffic corridor to a standstill.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's opponents in the April 11 primary accused him of ducking debates at a news conference outside his City Hall office Wednesday. Environmental activist Laura M. Lake, transportation consultant Ryan Snyder and political consultant Jack McGrath said Yaroslavsky owes 5th District voters an explanation of his record. List of Forums "Zev has said he was ready to campaign, but we want to know when he's going to show up for some debates," Lake said.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
With his swank new Westside hotel sitting empty and losing a reported $800,000 a month, developer Sheldon Gordon struck a desperate deal. Gordon wrote a check for $250,000 to a group of Los Angeles homeowners that had dragged the project through months of tedious hearings. He also dropped $800,000 into a bank account--to be controlled by him and the homeowners--to find more parking. The homeowners, in return, consented to leave the Ma Maison Sofitel alone.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of supporters hoisting blue and white campaign signs practically cheered themselves silly when Laura M. Lake recently announced her plans for a grass-roots political assault on Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky. "We've beaten Zev before and we'll beat him again," Lake pledged as she formally kicked off her campaign in the shadow of the Westside Pavilion mall. " . . . We will retake the 5th District block by block and house by house."
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
There was every reason to believe that TV producer Aaron Spelling would own the biggest house in Los Angeles. After all, the nearly completed structure dominates an entire ridge in Holmby Hills. It has more floor space--a whopping 56,500 square feet--than Hearst Castle, with its own gym, bowling alley and an entire mezzanine floor of closets. "It looks like Versailles," nearby homeowner Betsy Laties said, gazing up from the street far below.
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