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NEWS
May 22, 2001 | ANN GERHART, WASHINGTON POST
People don't whistle much anymore. It used to be so American, so evocative of our rugged individualism and independence, of a certain jaunty happy-go-luckiness. A fella whistled while he worked, whistled a happy tune, then wet his whistle with a cold one, and whistled at the girls going by. Jiminy Cricket whistled, and the Seven Dwarfs, and Gene Kelly and Santa Claus and Woodrow Wilson and Charles Lindbergh and Albert Einstein.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
The railroad first arrived at this quiet agricultural village in the Central Valley about a century ago, linking its fruit orchards and farm fields to the big world beyond. Now a train hasn't been seen in a couple of decades. The tracks to Linden seemed destined to go the way of so many rail spurs across America -- left to twist and rot, historical remnants abandoned for a different transportation future. But a dogged band of rail buffs has a different outcome in mind.
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NEWS
May 22, 2001 | WILLIAM HAGEMAN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Ask Dan Robbins about his contribution to 20th century culture--and what it says about art in this country--and he'll chuckle. Then he'll shake his head. It was slightly more than a half-century ago that Robbins came up with an idea that was to shake America. It was a concept that became as big as poodle skirts or air-raid drills back in the 1950s. The idea was the paint-by-numbers kit.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | ANN GERHART, WASHINGTON POST
People don't whistle much anymore. It used to be so American, so evocative of our rugged individualism and independence, of a certain jaunty happy-go-luckiness. A fella whistled while he worked, whistled a happy tune, then wet his whistle with a cold one, and whistled at the girls going by. Jiminy Cricket whistled, and the Seven Dwarfs, and Gene Kelly and Santa Claus and Woodrow Wilson and Charles Lindbergh and Albert Einstein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men and women stood on the bluff in admiration of flight. Not the flight of planes or birds, but of people who fly without the gift of wings or the burden of engines. This group of hang gliders--including the pioneers of the sport--gathered Saturday at Dockweiler State Beach for a reunion celebrating three decades of flying over these local sands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
The railroad first arrived at this quiet agricultural village in the Central Valley about a century ago, linking its fruit orchards and farm fields to the big world beyond. Now a train hasn't been seen in a couple of decades. The tracks to Linden seemed destined to go the way of so many rail spurs across America -- left to twist and rot, historical remnants abandoned for a different transportation future. But a dogged band of rail buffs has a different outcome in mind.
NEWS
February 18, 1985 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
In a smooth 3 1/2-hour operation Sunday, Dr. William C. DeVries and his surgical team implanted an artificial heart in Murray P. Haydon, and for the first time permanent man-made heart pumps were keeping two human beings alive simultaneously. Haydon, a 58-year-old retired assembly line worker, was in "very stable" condition after becoming the third recipient of a permanent artificial heart, said Dr. Allan M. Lansing, medical director of Humana Heart Institute International.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2002 | BOB THOMAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sid Caesar, who turns 80 on Sunday, hasn't lost the touch that side-split a nation during his reign as early television's king of comedy. Not one for the quick-hit zingers typical of that other TV pioneer Milton Berle, Caesar was always a sketch comedian who could lose his own persona in a variety of outrageous characters and "languages."
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | WILLIAM HAGEMAN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Ask Dan Robbins about his contribution to 20th century culture--and what it says about art in this country--and he'll chuckle. Then he'll shake his head. It was slightly more than a half-century ago that Robbins came up with an idea that was to shake America. It was a concept that became as big as poodle skirts or air-raid drills back in the 1950s. The idea was the paint-by-numbers kit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men and women stood on the bluff in admiration of flight. Not the flight of planes or birds, but of people who fly without the gift of wings or the burden of engines. This group of hang gliders--including the pioneers of the sport--gathered Saturday at Dockweiler State Beach for a reunion celebrating three decades of flying over these local sands.
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