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Hochman Salkin Deroy

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BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
One of the West Coast's leading tax-law firms has agreed to settle for $4.9 million three class-action lawsuits accusing the firm of fraud and negligence stemming from work it did for convicted tax shelter promoter Gerald L. Schulman, court papers show. The firm, Hochman, Salkin & DeRoy in Beverly Hills, is one of the defendants named in the class-action lawsuits, which have been consolidated in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
One of the West Coast's leading tax-law firms has agreed to settle for $4.9 million three class-action lawsuits accusing the firm of fraud and negligence stemming from work it did for convicted tax shelter promoter Gerald L. Schulman, court papers show. The firm, Hochman, Salkin & DeRoy in Beverly Hills, is one of the defendants named in the class-action lawsuits, which have been consolidated in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
December 8, 1985
Stephen V. Wilson, a former federal prosecutor and a law professor at Loyola University in Los Angeles, has been formally sworn in as a federal judge in ceremonies at the U.S. Courthouse in downtown Los Angeles. Wilson, 44, was installed after the Senate confirmed his nomination by President Reagan. He has been with the Los Angeles law firm of Hochman, Salkin & DeRoy for several years and has taught law at Loyola and at the University of San Diego. He was with the U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Although considered a tough-minded conservative, those who know U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson were not surprised Thursday by his ruling to throw out provisions of a 1952 immigration law used by the government to deport aliens if they advocate world communism. "He calls a spade a spade," said civil rights attorney Steven Yagman, who has had his share of run-ins with judges in the Los Angeles Federal Courthouse. "He never makes a decision with fear or favor."
BUSINESS
July 24, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
The Drexel Burnham Lambert investment bank and Executive Life, a Los Angeles insurance firm, will pay about $30 million to settle a class-action lawsuit brought on behalf of 4,200 people who invested through a North Hollywood tax-shelter promoter that the two companies helped finance, according to court records and lawyers familiar with the case. The settlement is expected to be presented today for approval to U.S. District Court Judge A. Andrew Hauk in Los Angeles.
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