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NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Hard-core Harry Potter fans who devoured the books, camped out for the movies and trekked through the theme park now have a new way to relive the boy wizard's adventures. PHOTOS: Making of Harry Potter studio tour Debuting Saturday, the Making of Harry Potter behind-the-scenes tour at theWarner Bros.studios in England will let wizards, mudbloods and muggles pull back the curtain on the movie-making secrets of the most successful film series of all time. Located 20 miles outside of London, the three-hour self-guided tour will take visitors past sets, props, costumes, models and special effects exhibits from the eight "Harry Potter" movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Warner Bros. and "Harry Potter" author J.K. Rowling are going to try to catch lightning in a bottle again. The Hollywood movie studio and best-selling writer have unveiled a new agreement to make movies based on Rowling's work. While Harry Potter may be over, the witches and wizards that can be found in Potter's Hogwarts textbook "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," along with the adventures of fictitious author Newt Scamander will live on. "'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' is neither a prequel nor a sequel to the Harry Potter series, but an extension of the wizarding world,” Rowling said in a statement.  “The laws and customs of the hidden magical society will be familiar to anyone who has read the Harry Potter books or seen the films, but Newt's story will start in New York, 70 years before Harry's gets underway.”  PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times Rowling will write the screenplay for “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” which Warner Bros.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Magizoology is sure to be trending after Thursday's news that J.K. Rowling is returning to her Harry Potter roots. The bestselling author's new partnership with Warner Bros. will involve inventing a new series of movies based on Newt Scamander, the fictional author of Harry Potter's first-year textbook "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. " Turns out Mr. Scamander is a magizoologist, one who studies magical creatures. His book, which features 75 magical species found around the world, was culled from his years of travel across five continents.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Magizoology is sure to be trending after Thursday's news that J.K. Rowling is returning to her Harry Potter roots. The bestselling author's new partnership with Warner Bros. will involve inventing a new series of movies based on Newt Scamander, the fictional author of Harry Potter's first-year textbook "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. " Turns out Mr. Scamander is a magizoologist, one who studies magical creatures. His book, which features 75 magical species found around the world, was culled from his years of travel across five continents.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Warner Bros. and "Harry Potter" author J.K. Rowling are going to try to catch lightning in a bottle again. The Hollywood movie studio and best-selling writer have unveiled a new agreement to make movies based on Rowling's work. While Harry Potter may be over, the witches and wizards that can be found in Potter's Hogwarts textbook "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," along with the adventures of fictitious author Newt Scamander will live on. "'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them' is neither a prequel nor a sequel to the Harry Potter series, but an extension of the wizarding world,” Rowling said in a statement.  “The laws and customs of the hidden magical society will be familiar to anyone who has read the Harry Potter books or seen the films, but Newt's story will start in New York, 70 years before Harry's gets underway.”  PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times Rowling will write the screenplay for “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” which Warner Bros.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Harry Potter fans rejoice: Researchers have devised an ultra-thin invisibility cloak that can mask three-dimensional objects -- if you're observing that object in microwave light, that is. With butterbeer and Bertie Bott's every flavor beans on the market, perhaps it was only a matter of time before invisibility cloaks edged from Hogwarts fantasy toward engineered reality. Previous research has focused on metamaterials -- man-made materials engineered into tiny repeating patterns that can bend light waves around an object, rather than letting it bounce and scatter from the surface and into our eyes, allowing us to see it. But a new study, published in the New Journal of Physics, describes a method called "mantle cloaking," which uses a less bulky, more conformable "metascreen" fashioned with 66-micrometer-thick copper strips and 100-micrometer polycarbonate film in a fishnet design.
IMAGE
September 9, 2007 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
Private school is having a fashion moment. Buttoned blazers, knee socks, crested sweaters, university-striped scarves, rep ties -- all those stodgy restrictions of self-expression are looking like high style this fall. From the Balenciaga runway to the pages of theJ. Crew catalog, designers are turning the preppy uniform into something actually cool and wearable. Why do we feel so ready for it, after a summer of free-flowing style? Maybe it's the Harry Potter effect. Call it "Hogwarts Chic."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Daniel Radcliffe has spent half his life in the role of boy wizard Harry Potter, so it's difficult to imagine any surprises presenting themselves on the set of the sixth film, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," which arrives in theaters July 15. "You would think that, but truly every film is different, and this time around the refreshing aspect was the adolescent romantic core of this film, which should be absolutely charming and very funny," Radcliffe said during a break from shooting.
SPORTS
July 5, 2003
Regarding the 1,000 words photo July 1: Those people in the Wimbledon crowd aren't dressed up as dogs. They are Wombles. Wombles are beloved characters in English children's literature. They live underneath Wimbledon Common, recycling all the litter they find. Susan Kopf-Ray Los Angeles
NEWS
December 24, 2001 | AL MARTINEZ
It sits on the boulevard like a combination of Hollywood and Hogwarts, all grand and glittery and more than slightly excessive. Critics call it a monstrosity, its supporters call it a miracle. My friend Jeffrey wonders why there's an elephant on the ceiling. It was named Hollywood & Highland by its builders because that's where it is. While the name may seem to manifest a significant lack of imagination, one can't help but be impressed by its awesome simplicity. For those who have yet to witness the structure's $615-million splendor either up close or from the tattoo parlor across the street, it is indeed an eye-catching edifice with, as a colleague wrote, its "soaring walls and grand entryway."
SCIENCE
March 27, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Harry Potter fans rejoice: Researchers have devised an ultra-thin invisibility cloak that can mask three-dimensional objects -- if you're observing that object in microwave light, that is. With butterbeer and Bertie Bott's every flavor beans on the market, perhaps it was only a matter of time before invisibility cloaks edged from Hogwarts fantasy toward engineered reality. Previous research has focused on metamaterials -- man-made materials engineered into tiny repeating patterns that can bend light waves around an object, rather than letting it bounce and scatter from the surface and into our eyes, allowing us to see it. But a new study, published in the New Journal of Physics, describes a method called "mantle cloaking," which uses a less bulky, more conformable "metascreen" fashioned with 66-micrometer-thick copper strips and 100-micrometer polycarbonate film in a fishnet design.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Hard-core Harry Potter fans who devoured the books, camped out for the movies and trekked through the theme park now have a new way to relive the boy wizard's adventures. PHOTOS: Making of Harry Potter studio tour Debuting Saturday, the Making of Harry Potter behind-the-scenes tour at theWarner Bros.studios in England will let wizards, mudbloods and muggles pull back the curtain on the movie-making secrets of the most successful film series of all time. Located 20 miles outside of London, the three-hour self-guided tour will take visitors past sets, props, costumes, models and special effects exhibits from the eight "Harry Potter" movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Reporting from Orlando, Fla. — Imagine if Peter Jackson had been able to chat with J.R.R. Tolkien while directing "The Lord of the Rings" films, or if Walt Disney had been able to run the plans for his new Captain Nemo ride by Jules Verne. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which opened two weeks ago at Universal Orlando Resort's Islands of Adventure, will no doubt prove to be many things to many people — a haven for die-hard Potter fans, a starting point for the uninitiated, a template for park and ride designers — but it is also a monument to speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Geoff Boucher
Daniel Radcliffe has spent half his life in the role of boy wizard Harry Potter, so it's difficult to imagine any surprises presenting themselves on the set of the sixth film, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," which arrives in theaters July 15. "You would think that, but truly every film is different, and this time around the refreshing aspect was the adolescent romantic core of this film, which should be absolutely charming and very funny," Radcliffe said during a break from shooting.
IMAGE
September 9, 2007 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
Private school is having a fashion moment. Buttoned blazers, knee socks, crested sweaters, university-striped scarves, rep ties -- all those stodgy restrictions of self-expression are looking like high style this fall. From the Balenciaga runway to the pages of theJ. Crew catalog, designers are turning the preppy uniform into something actually cool and wearable. Why do we feel so ready for it, after a summer of free-flowing style? Maybe it's the Harry Potter effect. Call it "Hogwarts Chic."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2007 | Susan King
DAVID YATES has made a name for himself as a director of politically charged British stories such as the BBC miniseries "State of Play" and the HBO movie "The Girl in the Cafe." So it seems a bit incongruous that the British filmmaker was asked to direct the fifth installment in the blockbuster "Harry Potter" franchise, "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," which opens July 13. "It was interesting to get the call," says Yates, who had never read any of J.K. Rowling's novels.
NEWS
November 25, 2004 | Susan King
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Daniel Radcliffe, Gary Oldman Warner Home Video, $30 The third and best adaptation of J.K. Rowling's bestsellers chronicling the adventures of a boy wizard. Mexican director Alfonso Cuaron of "Y Tu Mama Tambien" and "The Little Princess" took the directing baton from Chris Columbus and brought a new style and intelligence to Hogwarts. The addition of David Thewlis as Professor Lupin and Gary Oldman as Sirius Black beef up the already good cast as well.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | MIKE DOWNEY
Harry Potter, Harry Potter, Harry Potter. Everywhere I go now, I hear about Harry Potter. Six weeks ago, I had never even heard the name Harry Potter. I didn't know Harry Potter from Peter Piper. "Who's Harry Potter?" I asked a woman in a bookstore who had just asked about a book by Harry Potter. "Who's Harry Potter!!!" she replied, as if I had just asked who was Donald Duck. "I don't know his books," I said somewhat sheepishly, although I have never actually listened to a sheep.
OPINION
July 10, 2005 | JOEL STEIN
Next Saturday, when the sixth Harry Potter book comes out, at the very least I want you to stammer excuses when I see "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" on your nightstand. I want you to claim you're reading it to make sure it's OK for your kids, or your future kids, or even, if you have to, for kids in general. I don't want you to tell me how well J.K. Rowling writes, or that academics are writing papers about it, or that Harry Potter can be read on many levels.
NEWS
November 25, 2004 | Susan King
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Daniel Radcliffe, Gary Oldman Warner Home Video, $30 The third and best adaptation of J.K. Rowling's bestsellers chronicling the adventures of a boy wizard. Mexican director Alfonso Cuaron of "Y Tu Mama Tambien" and "The Little Princess" took the directing baton from Chris Columbus and brought a new style and intelligence to Hogwarts. The addition of David Thewlis as Professor Lupin and Gary Oldman as Sirius Black beef up the already good cast as well.
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