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Holiday Season

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | KATE FOLMAR
Strategies to stymie fraud and prevent employee theft during the holiday season top the agenda for this month's Sepulveda/Van Nuys Boulevard Business Watch meeting at 6:30 tonight.The reason for the meeting is simple, said Los Angeles Police Department Officer Tim Bergstrom: "Crime tends to increase over the holidays. . . . People need money for the holidays. If they don't have it, they 'borrow' it from you and I."
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2000 | ANNE D'INNOCENZIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prospects for a strong holiday season grew dimmer Thursday after the nation's largest retailers reported generally disappointing sales results for October. While many specialty apparel retailers including Talbots, Wet Seal Inc. and Limited Inc., enjoyed healthy sales, many other stores languished amid slowing consumer spending. "Don't count on the consumer," said retail industry analyst Jeffrey Feiner of Lehman Bros. "They're not buying. I think the holiday season will be less than stellar."
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | CAROLINE LEMKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
'Tis the season for music, lights, food, parades and more. From the traditional to the unique, there will be a plenitude of holiday events offered in the coming weeks by city parks and recreation departments, chambers of commerce and community groups. Below is a guide to some of the Christmas and Hanukkah sights and sounds of North County. For Kids Dance: (Dec. 6, 7-10 p.m., Harding Auditorium, 3096 Harding St.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The approaching holiday shopping season looks promising, analysts said Wednesday, despite signs of a slowdown in consumer spending. Though consumers pinched pennies in October, they plan to boost Christmas spending by 12% over 1995, according to survey results released Wednesday. Consumers will spend an average of $764 on holiday gifts, up from $695 in 1995, according to research from Deloitte & Touche and the National Retail Federation.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
Francie Todd's two boys may not notice it, but there will be fewer toys under the tree this Christmas. Amid higher gasoline prices and other effects of Hurricane Katrina, Todd plans to cut her toy spending in half. "You look at the economic climate overall, and this is not a good time to run up the credit cards," said Todd of East Lansing, Mich., who planned to spend about $100 on toys for each child, down from $200 last year.
NEWS
December 14, 2000 | KEVIN COWHERD, BALTIMORE SUN
One of the exquisite joys of the holiday season is listening to bad Christmas music, and this year there is again no shortage of stuff that will pin your ears to the wall. First of all, it's my sad duty to announce that Ally McBeal actually has a Christmas album out now called "A Very Ally Christmas." Technically, of course, Ally McBeal does not really exist, as she is merely an irritating character on an even more irritating Fox TV show.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2008 | From Reuters
Sears Holdings Corp. said Monday that sales at stores open at least a year fell 3.5% in the holiday period and warned that fiscal fourth-quarter profit could be less than half that of a year earlier, sending its shares down 5%. The retailer run by hedge fund manager Edward Lampert blamed the weak holiday sales on increased competition, the crumbling U.S. housing market and the credit crunch -- problems it had flagged in November. The company's shares fell $4.79 to $91.38.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | ELAINE ST. JAMES
Now that the holidays are over, your first instinct is probably to pack up the ornaments, wrapping paper, cookie molds and stockings, and get on with your real life. If you're like most Americans, that includes finding a workable payment plan for your maxed-out credit cards and a diet for your maxed-out body. As one reader said to me, "I can make it through the holidays. But the post-holiday letdown really gets to me."
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | JANE SUTTON, United Press International
For the millions of American who suffer from phobias and panic disorders, the approaching holiday season holds all the joy of an invitation to a lion's den. Afflicted with an intense irrational fear that produces debilitating physical symptoms, phobics become adept at avoiding the thing or situation that terrifies them. But the holiday season, with its round of parties, shopping and family obligations, can force them out into the open.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1990 | RICK DU BROW
TV or not TV. . . . RETAKES: It's movie-buff heaven on TV during the holiday season. For the next few weeks, old and new classics will pour forth--for example, "From Here to Eternity," on both cable's TBS and KCOP Channel 13. TBS offers the film--with Montgomery Clift, Burt Lancaster, Deborah Kerr, Frank Sinatra and Donna Reed--on Dec. 27. It's part of a weeklong TBS package that also includes "Sergeant York" on Monday, "Casablanca" on Christmas and "On the Waterfront" on Dec. 26.
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