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Hollinger Inc

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BUSINESS
April 9, 1998 | Reuters
Conrad Black, whose newspaper empire extends from Chicago to London to Jerusalem, is going ahead with plans to publish a new national daily paper in Canada, his home country. Southam Inc., the Canadian newspaper group controlled by Black, said that the long-rumored venture will proceed this fall. The new paper, yet to be named, will be the third nationally circulated Canadian daily.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2004 | From Reuters
Former newspaper baron Conrad Black resigned as chairman and chief executive of Hollinger Inc. on Tuesday, in his effort to take the Canadian holding company private. Black's lawyer and spokesman had said Friday that Black would quit within days. A day before, Black proposed to buy out minority Hollinger shareholders, although a price has not yet been set. The Toronto company owns 18.2% of U.S. newspaper publisher Hollinger International Inc.
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BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Chicago Sun-Times, the nation's 11th-largest daily newspaper, will be sold to Canadian publisher Hollinger Inc. for about $180 million in cash, the companies said Monday. The deal provides the Sun-Times with solid financial backing and nearly doubles the circulation of Hollinger's U.S. daily newspapers, according to company officials and an industry analyst. "We have now ensured the long-term viability of the Chicago Sun-Times, as well as our suburban newspaper companies," Sam S.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1998 | Reuters
Conrad Black, whose newspaper empire extends from Chicago to London to Jerusalem, is going ahead with plans to publish a new national daily paper in Canada, his home country. Southam Inc., the Canadian newspaper group controlled by Black, said that the long-rumored venture will proceed this fall. The new paper, yet to be named, will be the third nationally circulated Canadian daily.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2004 | From Reuters
Former newspaper baron Conrad Black resigned as chairman and chief executive of Hollinger Inc. on Tuesday, in his effort to take the Canadian holding company private. Black's lawyer and spokesman had said Friday that Black would quit within days. A day before, Black proposed to buy out minority Hollinger shareholders, although a price has not yet been set. The Toronto company owns 18.2% of U.S. newspaper publisher Hollinger International Inc.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2004 | From Reuters
Newspaper tycoon Conrad Black, battling fraud charges and shareholder lawsuits, set terms to take his Canadian holding company private, away from the scrutiny of increasingly angry regulators. Black offered to pay about $61 million to buy out minority shareholders of Hollinger Inc., one day after U.S. regulators accused him and the Canadian firm of defrauding Hollinger International Inc. investors.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Hollinger Inc., the company that Conrad Black uses to control his newspaper empire, said its auditor, KPMG, resigned after the company's board refused to make management changes the firm requested. Daniel Colson also resigned as a director and as vice chairman to devote attention to Hollinger's main unit, newspaper publisher Hollinger International Inc., which said last month that it was exploring a sale.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Media tycoon Conrad Black and longtime business partner David Radler have resigned as officers and directors of Ravelston Corp., the private holding company behind the troubled Hollinger media empire. A lawyer for Ravelston told Ontario Superior Court in Canada about the resignations as the firm sought bankruptcy protection from creditors. The lawyer said Ravelston had been drained of cash because it no longer received multimillion-dollar management fees from its subsidiaries Hollinger Inc.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2005
Mark Kipnis, former corporate counsel at Hollinger International Inc., pleaded not guilty to charges that he helped Conrad Black steal $51.8 million from the newspaper company.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Former Chicago Sun-Times publisher David Radler, a lawyer for the newspaper's parent company and a media holding company controlled by Conrad Black were indicted on federal fraud charges Thursday for allegedly diverting $32 million through a series of bogus deals. The indictment alleged the three diverted the money through a series of secret deals by disguising it as noncompete fees connected to the sale of newspaper publishing groups. Radler, Mark S.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Chicago Sun-Times, the nation's 11th-largest daily newspaper, will be sold to Canadian publisher Hollinger Inc. for about $180 million in cash, the companies said Monday. The deal provides the Sun-Times with solid financial backing and nearly doubles the circulation of Hollinger's U.S. daily newspapers, according to company officials and an industry analyst. "We have now ensured the long-term viability of the Chicago Sun-Times, as well as our suburban newspaper companies," Sam S.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Hollinger International Inc., owner of the Chicago Sun-Times, reached agreements to sell its remaining U.S. community newspapers for $215 million as it moves to reduce debt. The buyers are Bradford Publications Co., Newspaper Holdings Inc., Paxton Media Group Inc. and Forum Communications Co. The sales involve 11 dailies, three weeklies and 21 shoppers in 10 states. Chicago-based Hollinger didn't break down which company is buying which paper.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Hollinger International Inc. said a former executive agreed to cooperate with the newspaper publisher in a lawsuit that alleges former Chairman Conrad Black helped mastermind a scheme to misappropriate $390 million of company funds. Peter Atkinson, who was Black's top in-house lawyer from 1995 until Atkinson resigned as executive vice president of Hollinger International in January, settled similar allegations and repaid $2.8 million, the company said.
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