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Hollis Gentry

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saxophonist Hollis Gentry spent most of last summer touring thecountry with pop jazz guitarist Larry Carlton, a plum assignment that gave him a national profile and also helped publicize his own light jazz band, Neon. But chasing success in commercial pop jazz isn't enough for Gentry, who is 36 and lives in San Diego. He is equally drawn to traditional acoustic jazz, the music of people like saxman Cannonball Adderley, Gentry's mentor. "It's always been a foot in each camp," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a philosophical Super Bowl going on inside the tall, lanky saxophonist Hollis Gentry. On one side of the musical 50-yard line is fusion, that oft-maligned melange of jazz, funk, pop, Latin, reggae and other genres. On the other is be-bop, or traditional jazz, that Gentry also loves to play. So far, the contest is a draw. Gentry displays his affinity for contemporary jazz with his band, Neon, and in collaboration with other artists including pianist David Benoit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1987 | STACY FINZ
Some of San Diego's most popular jazz groups will come together tonight for a benefit concert to raise money for local jazz-soul singer Ella Ruth Piggee's medical bills. Piggee, who has been performing in San Diego for seven years, was hospitalized April 29 to have a tumor removed, but she has no medical insurance. "There's no organized medical plan for musicians," said saxophonist Hollis Gentry, founder of the jazz-fusion band Neon, who will be the last group to play tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saxophonist Hollis Gentry spent most of last summer touring thecountry with pop jazz guitarist Larry Carlton, a plum assignment that gave him a national profile and also helped publicize his own light jazz band, Neon. But chasing success in commercial pop jazz isn't enough for Gentry, who is 36 and lives in San Diego. He is equally drawn to traditional acoustic jazz, the music of people like saxman Cannonball Adderley, Gentry's mentor. "It's always been a foot in each camp," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a philosophical Super Bowl going on inside the tall, lanky saxophonist Hollis Gentry. On one side of the musical 50-yard line is fusion, that oft-maligned melange of jazz, funk, pop, Latin, reggae and other genres. On the other is be-bop, or traditional jazz, that Gentry also loves to play. So far, the contest is a draw. Gentry displays his affinity for contemporary jazz with his band, Neon, and in collaboration with other artists including pianist David Benoit.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1988
Nearly a dozen San Diego jazz acts will be presented Saturday in a six-hour tribute to the late Ella Ruth Piggee at the Educational Cultural Complex in Southeast San Diego. The popular local jazz singer died last month after a long bout with cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1988 | DIRK SUTRO
San Diego jazz fans can ring in the New Year with the likes of David Benoit, Stanley Clarke and other jazz talents in live performances, or they can drop by their record store and stock up from the array of new albums. Also, radio stations will be mixing jazz versions of Christmas songs into their regular play lists, and several clubs are planning special jazz events for New Year's Eve. December in general is an action-packed month for San Diego jazz. Here's a look. In person: At the B St. Cafe & Bar, 425 W. B St., downtown San Diego, Hollis Gentry's Neon plays Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights through the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1987 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
In May, saxophonist Hollis Gentry III received one of the biggest blows of his professional life. He was unceremoniously fired from Fattburger, the popular jazz-fusion group he had founded a year and a half before, due to disagreements with other band members. The dismissal came on the eve of Fattburger's landing a national recording contract--a goal Gentry, 32, had been striving for since he began playing San Diego nightclubs in 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people say jazz doesn't have much of a following anymore. Tell that to the 600 or so people who showed up each week last summer for Carlsbad's "Jazz in the Parks" series. Young and old, male and female, people of all shapes and sizes spread out blankets, unfolded lawn chairs and dug into their ice chests as the sun went down and top San Diego County jazz players delivered good sounds. This year's Friday series opens with a 6 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002
We're writing to contest--to put it mildly--the opening comment in Dean Kuipers' piece, "All That Young Jazz" (June 20), that Leimert Park's World Stage died in the 1990s. Not only did the Stage grow considerably in the 1990s, offering many opportunities to artists of all ages, but it continues to present a wide range of programs, despite the passings of key participants Billy Higgins and Horace Tapscott. The error does a disservice to the music's history in this city and to young artists in search of a nurturing, creative environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1987 | STACY FINZ
Some of San Diego's most popular jazz groups will come together tonight for a benefit concert to raise money for local jazz-soul singer Ella Ruth Piggee's medical bills. Piggee, who has been performing in San Diego for seven years, was hospitalized April 29 to have a tumor removed, but she has no medical insurance. "There's no organized medical plan for musicians," said saxophonist Hollis Gentry, founder of the jazz-fusion band Neon, who will be the last group to play tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Larry Carlton is back and looking good. More than two years after he was shot in the neck by an unknown gunman, the guitarist shows no signs of the trauma he suffered in his voice and left arm. Any questions to the contrary were quickly dispatched at his Universal Amphitheatre concert Saturday night when Carlton opened his set with a whimsical, hard-swinging vocal on "Crazy Momma."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Jewel Kelley sees it, the time has come to change the image of black men in America. "We, as a black women's group, see the desperate need to help African-American young males try to get a head start," said Kelley, a member of the San Diego chapter of The Links Inc., a nonprofit group committed to educational, cultural and civic projects. "We want to look at them as being analytically savvy," Kelley said.
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