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Hollis L Harris

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BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
Continental Airlines Holdings Inc. has asked a large Houston business group to help it raise capital from local investors, says Chairman Hollis L. Harris. The company, operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, is trying to raise $550 million to help it expand, Harris said. Harris is a member of the Greater Houston Partnership, the city's largest business group. He met with other board members about two weeks ago to discuss how local investors could invest in the airline.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Continental Airlines has ordered 25 new Boeing 757 jets--with an option for 25 more--in a multibillion-dollar deal, airline officials said Monday. "We're looking at the long-term needs of the airline," Continental spokesman David Messing said. "We know we have higher fuel prices, and some expect a recession, but we want to add capacity for when the economy returns to strength." The order for the first 25 jets is valued at $1.2 billion, Messing said.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
Frank Lorenzo, a central figure during a tumultuous period in the airline industry and the bane of organized labor, announced today he was getting out of the business. Lorenzo's Continental Airlines Holdings Inc. said he was selling most of his stake in the company, formerly known as Texas Air Corp., to Scandinavian Airlines System and would quit as chairman and chief executive. His departure marks the end of an era in the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Canada teamed with two Texas investors Thursday to announce a $400-million bid to buy a controlling interest in Houston-based Continental Airlines, the third offer for the financially troubled carrier. Continental, which is operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, already has attracted a $350-million offer from Houston money man Charles E. Hurwitz and his company, Maxxam, as well as a $385-million proposal from a group led by Mexican investor Alfredo Brener.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1989 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
In a deal that ultimately could be worth $2 billion, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines said Sunday that they would combine their computerized reservations systems, creating a "global" behemoth that will handle about half of the nation's airline reservations. American's system, named Sabre, is already the nation's largest with computer locations at about 14,000, or 42%, of the nation's 33,000 travel agents. Delta is a very small player with only about 9% of the market.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Lorenzo, the man organized labor loved to hate but who changed the travel industry with low fares and tough competition, on Thursday bailed out of the airline business. Lorenzo announced that he is selling most of his stake in Continental Airlines Holdings, which owns Continental and Eastern airlines, to Scandinavian Airlines System and is quitting as chairman and chief executive. SAS, which already owns 9.9% of Continental Airlines Holdings (formerly Texas Air Corp.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a deal that would unite two struggling carriers, Continental Airlines on Monday accepted a $450-million offer from Air Canada and other investors that is expected to allow the U.S. carrier to emerge from a long stay in bankruptcy court. The partnership between the U.S. and Canadian carriers, which is subject to court and government approval, continues a trend toward international airline alliances. Both airlines left the door open to future partnerships with carriers of other countries.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lamar Durrett, who recently took over as president and chief executive of Air Canada from his good friend, longtime colleague and fellow Georgian Hollis L. Harris, has heard the grumbling and the jokes: * In the media and on the cocktail party circuit, Canadians ever vigilant to what they consider undue U.S. influence here ask: Why another American at the helm of this country's flagship air carrier, the one whose planes sport the Canadian maple leaf on their tails?
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