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Holly Coors

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NEWS
September 19, 1988 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
The Coors clan gathers only rarely--family togetherness, Sunday afternoons spent bouncing the babies and taking happy snapshots out by the garden barbecue is in no way the style of this independent bunch. But when they do collect for some family celebration, maybe an anniversary or at Christmas, it must be a seething scene of heated disagreement on practically everything.
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NEWS
November 1, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--As royal weddings go, this one was a simple affair. Only family members and senior Buddhist priests, but no foreign dignitaries, were present at the wedding of King Jigme Singye Wangchuk of Bhutan--a traditional hourlong Buddhist ceremony at an ancient monastery in Punakha, according to Bhutan Foreign Minister Dawa Tsering. It wasn't only the lack of pomp, however, that made the ceremony unusual by Western standards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1988
Another loyal wife who was taught to "obey" her husband. Holly Coors "never did anything without asking his permission." "I never questioned Joe." When her husband threw her oldest son out of the house and exiled him for 10 years she "cried a lot" but accepted. Her holier-than-thou husband left her anyway. When are we women going to learn it doesn't work! Giving up our own beliefs and identity to please someone else is an exercise in futility. It never has and never will work. Finally, Ms. Coors is realizing her own potential but what of all those wasted years, not to mention the humiliation, frustration and pain she is experiencing now?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1988
Another loyal wife who was taught to "obey" her husband. Holly Coors "never did anything without asking his permission." "I never questioned Joe." When her husband threw her oldest son out of the house and exiled him for 10 years she "cried a lot" but accepted. Her holier-than-thou husband left her anyway. When are we women going to learn it doesn't work! Giving up our own beliefs and identity to please someone else is an exercise in futility. It never has and never will work. Finally, Ms. Coors is realizing her own potential but what of all those wasted years, not to mention the humiliation, frustration and pain she is experiencing now?
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--As royal weddings go, this one was a simple affair. Only family members and senior Buddhist priests, but no foreign dignitaries, were present at the wedding of King Jigme Singye Wangchuk of Bhutan--a traditional hourlong Buddhist ceremony at an ancient monastery in Punakha, according to Bhutan Foreign Minister Dawa Tsering. It wasn't only the lack of pomp, however, that made the ceremony unusual by Western standards.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | MARY LOU LOPER
Bustling about in a long pink taffeta ball gown, Junior League "Oooh la la, L.A.!" chairperson Andi O'Leary surveyed the crowd of about 475 and said, "Easily." She meant that the league easily would make $100,000 on its benefit for services in the city. But, it hadn't been that easy. The Tuesday before last Saturday's benefit, only 300 were booked for the party, and that would have created a net of about $60,000. "I wanted 450, to do $100,000," she said. So leaguers got on the phones.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As video footage in November showed survivors stranded on rooftops and new mud canyons cut through hamlets by the flood waters of tropical storm Mitch, U.S. news shows began ending their broadcasts with the question "What do you need?" Usually, the reply was delivered in a soft, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis-style voice speaking perfect English. Honduras' Anglo first lady, Mary Flake de Flores, was on the job, getting help for her beleaguered country.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They were going to wait two more minutes, but someone reminded them of their principles. "We're conservatives," said Ted Maravelias. "We start promptly." And so, in the nearly empty lobby of a Houston hotel, before the party-hardy delegates had roused themselves to fill the tables of the adjoining coffee shop, Maravelias opened the day's first press conference. First, he reminded himself why he was here: "On behalf of conservatives for Bush--uh, against Bush," he said.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Somebody else does the cooking; Arianna Huffington selects the menu: rack of lamb and ravioli with asparagus tips and wild mushrooms. She puts on a black velvet skirt, white silk top and black cashmere sweater by Valentino--Nancy Reagan's designer of choice. The guests, an assemblage of conservative big shots--including media watchers, think tankers and pundits--gather before a roaring fire for cocktails, then move on to dinner.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
Like most of the men in the family, Jeff Coors, 43, new president of the Adolph Coors Co., is quiet, friendly, totally unaffected and given to startling remarks. Sitting in his office on the brewery grounds, here is the first thing he said: "Jeez, I hope you don't try to paint this family as some sort of idealistic, above-it-all kind of family. There are no fairy tales involved in this family.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
The Coors clan gathers only rarely--family togetherness, Sunday afternoons spent bouncing the babies and taking happy snapshots out by the garden barbecue is in no way the style of this independent bunch. But when they do collect for some family celebration, maybe an anniversary or at Christmas, it must be a seething scene of heated disagreement on practically everything.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The delegation from Adolph Coors Co. did not get the Empire State's warmest welcome when it arrived in Albany, N.Y., last March to publicize the brewery's expansion into the New York market. As the group trotted up the state Capitol steps, they were met by an angry group of union members who unfurled anti-Coors banners and chanted, "One, two, three, four, we don't want no Coors no more." When a Coors wholesaler lunged for a union banner, a scuffle broke out.
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