Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHolly Hughes
IN THE NEWS

Holly Hughes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
It's a long way from tiny town Michigan to New York's East Village, but Holly Hughes has taken the trek as easily and as irreverently as she mixes travesty and social comment in her plays. After majoring in art in college and a furtive try at a career as a painter, Hughes discovered play writing in the early '80s while hanging out at the WOW Cafe, New York's premier bastion of feminist theater. Rebelling against a conservative, upper-middle-class upbringing, doing the shocking thing came almost naturally for Hughes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In "The Jackie Look," the last of eight monologues that make up her new book "The Reality Shows" (Feminist Press: 256 pp., $17.95 paper), Karen Finley offers a statement that suggests her point of view. "Life," she writes, "is more important than art / But life is meaningless without art. " Finley may be speaking in the voice of Jackie Kennedy, but she is also referring to herself. In the generation since she, along with fellow performance artists John Fleck, Tim Miller and Holly Hughes, were stripped of federal grant funding as members of the NEA Four, Finley has found herself represented in ways she never imagined, turned into a mirror for those on both sides of the free expression divide.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1990
Regarding Cathy Curtis' commentary on performance artist Holly Hughes ("Defending the Avant-Garde," Calendar, July 30): Curtis' attempt to "sanitize" Hughes' work was laughable and pathetic. The defense statement she faxed to Hughes could have described Mozart. But when Mozart decided to treat the human condition with lyricism, warmth and humor, he wrote "Cosi Fan Tutti." Hughes decided to publicly fondle her anatomy. Curtis seems to be consumed by an art uber-alles mentality; that it doesn't matter what actions a person may take, as long as they derive an aesthetically pleasing product from them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
John Fleck is rehearsing in a tiny Los Feliz theater, and he's utterly naked. Not naked like he was in the Reagan era, when he was leaping onto Silver Lake bars, dropping his drawers and belting out "There's No Penis Like Show Penis" to a roomful of rough-trade guys and spiky-haired punkettes. Or naked in the way that made Fleck and his fellow performance artists Karen Finley, Tim Miller and Holly Hughes (a.k.a. "The NEA 4") into Public Enemy No. 1 in the eyes of Jesse Helms and other wardens of public morality, sparking a 1990s culture-war skirmish involving the National Endowment for the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Holly Hughes carries heavy baggage into Highways. You don't see it. You feel it. "Clit Notes," Hughes' first produced work since being denied a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1990, is an attempt to leave behind the burdens of self-censorship and political martyrdom. But it's also an attempt to exorcise private demons by sharing autobiographical stories. "There is a war going on and all of us have been hit," Hughes declares, "some of us worse than others."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
It's impossible to ignore the current National Endowment for the Arts brouhaha--the on-again, off-again grants, the clauses, the rhetoric--while watching Holly Hughes reprise her 1989 work, "World Without End," at Highways. But it's also impossible not to contemplate a possibly depressing reality behind Hughes' autobiographical work. People like Hughes and Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) are never, ever , going to understand each other, because they stand for America's opposite cultural poles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
New York performance artist Holly Hughes dropped into Highways in Santa Monica on Thursday night to deliver "World Without End." The piece is as deceptively casual as a chat in a luncheonette booth but liable to leak into moments of sly sexual humor, flatten out into bald preaching about causes or catch hold of delicious, free-floating extended metaphors. Hughes' main themes--the lushness of sexual desire, the "otherness" of homosexuality, men's treatment of women, the gap between art and life--wove in and out of many narratives that started out somewhere in the Midwest and eventually glided into an updated Garden of Eden.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I can't tell a lie any longer." It's a line Holly Hughes repeats often. It's a line she uses to anchor some of her wilder tales as if to say she is not trying to offend anyone--she is merely trying to tell the truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Holly Hughes sits at a back table in a yuppie-filled Santa Monica restaurant, poking distractedly at her baby-greens salad and risotto. The bistro is a far cry from the Naugahyde booths of the Red Lobster, the dank Midwestern chain eatery where she once waitressed--and which lives on in the wry noir tales of her acclaimed solo performance works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1990
Your editorial was pure baloney. If "artists" Tim Miller, Karen Finley, Holly Hughes, and John Fleck want to prove that there is an artistic market for human feces, urine and blasphemy, let them prove it with their own money. The people who are paying, the taxpayers, have every right to restrict such foolishness through their representatives. Don't kid yourself, man. The "small but vocal coalition" you refer to is really the mainstream. The real weirdos are those artists who want complete freedom, supported by me and other taxpayers, without regard to any notion of decency.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1996 | LAURIE WINER TIMES THEATER CRITIC
At one point in her coming-of-age monologue "Cat O'Nine Tales," Holly Hughes states that she would not be an artist if she were not a lesbian. And yet that statement is shown to be improbable in Hughes' funny, roving one-woman show, a look backward to her childhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Holly Hughes carries heavy baggage into Highways. You don't see it. You feel it. "Clit Notes," Hughes' first produced work since being denied a National Endowment for the Arts grant in 1990, is an attempt to leave behind the burdens of self-censorship and political martyrdom. But it's also an attempt to exorcise private demons by sharing autobiographical stories. "There is a war going on and all of us have been hit," Hughes declares, "some of us worse than others."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Holly Hughes sits at a back table in a yuppie-filled Santa Monica restaurant, poking distractedly at her baby-greens salad and risotto. The bistro is a far cry from the Naugahyde booths of the Red Lobster, the dank Midwestern chain eatery where she once waitressed--and which lives on in the wry noir tales of her acclaimed solo performance works.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | FLECK, JOHN, From Associated Press
The National Endowment for the Arts agreed Friday to pay $252,000 to four artists whose grant applications were rejected in 1990 amid conservative complaints that the government was supporting obscene art. The artists--Los Angeles-based John Fleck and Tim Miller along with New York-based Karen Finley and Holly Hughes--agreed to accept the money in exchange for dropping some of the claims contained in a lawsuit they filed in September, 1990, NEA spokeswoman Ginny Terzano said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys representing four performance artists today will ask a Los Angeles federal judge to strike down statutory language restricting grants from the National Endowment for the Arts to applicants who meet "general standards of decency." The challenge is part of a lawsuit originally filed in September, 1990, by four artists whose NEA grants were denied amid a storm of controversy engulfing the federal arts agency. The National Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts awarded nearly $17 million Tuesday to support individuals and artistic programs throughout the country, including an $8,000 fellowship to each of two controversial solo performers whose highly political works contain gay and lesbian messages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four performance artists denied National Endowment for the Arts fellowships on what they say are political grounds filed suit Thursday in Los Angeles federal court seeking an order overruling the grant rejections. Lawyers for the four said they would also file a petition for a temporary restraining order today that would bar the arts endowment from spending the $23,000 earmarked for the fellowships until the dispute is resolved.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1989
Highways opens its first season in Santa Monica tonight. Most performances begin at 8:30 p.m. Tickets range from $5-$10. Information: (213) 453-1755. The May and June schedule: Today through Sunday: Short works by a total of 75 performance artists in six events. Friday: Cinco de Mayo performances. Next Thursday through May 13 and May 18-20: "Jupiter 35," by Los Angeles Poverty Department, a group of artists and homeless people directed by John Malpede. May 15: Standup comedy by SubGenius Church preacher St. Jaynor Hypercleats.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts' grant of $8,000 Solo Performance Theater Artist Fellowships to two of the so-called "NEA Four" on Tuesday has not slowed the quartet's yearlong legal battle over the agency's refusal to fund their 1990 projects. Tim Miller, a UCLA instructor, was one of four performance artists who sued the federal agency 13 months ago because NEA Chairman John E.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Documents unearthed in a year-old Los Angeles lawsuit against the National Endowment for the Arts indicate that the NEA's chairman may have rejected four performance artists' grants last year for fear of reprisals by politicians and conservative newspaper columnists, not for artistic reasons, plaintiffs charged Tuesday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|