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Holly Seacliff Development

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the City Council's approval of the massive Holly-Seacliff development late Monday, controversy remains over a planned hilltop project in the development and will delay construction another two months. The council late Monday approved developing 569 acres of the 780-acre mixed-use development, which will include 4,410 homes, an industrial area and a shopping center. But specific plans are unresolved for Reservoir Hill, which stands at the center of the lingering feud.
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NEWS
July 25, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO and THERESA MOREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Huntington Beach Mayor Dave Garofalo voted repeatedly in favor of a developer who at the time placed him on a VIP list to buy the most coveted lot in the company's upscale housing project, casting eight of the votes while the home was in escrow. Garofalo, then a councilman, was placed ahead of about 300 people on a waiting list to buy the first of 70 homes in the gated St. Augustine community, a development by PLC Land Co. called Holly Seacliff.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
The City Council this week declined to form a special district that would have required landowners to help pay for street improvements and other public services to accommodate the $1-billion Holly Seacliff development. Angry property owners claimed that the district would have unfairly forced them to pay about $10 million for public improvements that would benefit Seacliff Partners and the company's plans for nearly 4,000 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Two proposed neighborhoods in the Holly-Seacliff development will have fewer homes but a larger business area, a plan that both pleased and worried neighbors. "We are excited that the housing density is lower," said Colleen Wilson, a board member of the nearby Hampton Homeowner Assn., during a public hearing on the issue Monday. "Our concern is noise pollution. . . . This is where we chose to live and to be backed up to a super-supermarket is not what we bought our homes for."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Two proposed neighborhoods in the Holly-Seacliff development will have fewer homes but a larger business area, a plan that both pleased and worried neighbors. "We are excited that the housing density is lower," said Colleen Wilson, a board member of the nearby Hampton Homeowner Assn., during a public hearing on the issue Monday. "Our concern is noise pollution. . . . This is where we chose to live and to be backed up to a super-supermarket is not what we bought our homes for."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | BILL BILLITER
The builder of the Holly-Seacliff development is asking the city to create a special district that would help reimburse the company for streets and other infrastructure, a move that has angered some nearby property owners. Seacliff Partners is developing Holly-Seacliff, a 768-acre area northwest of downtown. Plans call for up to 3,780 housing units on the property. The company has a development agreement with the city that was approved by the City Council in 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Plans for the sprawling Holly-Seacliff development have been held up while state, city and school district officials sort out where a new elementary school for the area will be located. At the request of Duane Dishno, superintendent of the Huntington Beach City School District, the Planning Commission last week delayed its consideration of the bulk of the 780-acre project in the north-central part of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Organizations representing as many as 1,000 homeowners surrounding Holly-Seacliff have joined forces to oppose the sprawling planned development, charging that too many homes are being proposed in certain areas. Plans for the final 569 acres of the 780-acre project, approved this week by the Planning Commission, call for up to 3,780 homes in the north-central section of the city.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO and THERESA MOREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Huntington Beach Mayor Dave Garofalo voted repeatedly in favor of a developer who at the time placed him on a VIP list to buy the most coveted lot in the company's upscale housing project, casting eight of the votes while the home was in escrow. Garofalo, then a councilman, was placed ahead of about 300 people on a waiting list to buy the first of 70 homes in the gated St. Augustine community, a development by PLC Land Co. called Holly Seacliff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1991
Bill Plaschke's article ("Dodgers a Team in Name Only," Oct. 7) was right on. The only thing Dodger about this year's collection of hired guns was their uniforms. My skin crawls when I hear arrogant Dodger fans call sports-talk shows and drool over which players they hope to pluck from teams in smaller markets. MARC GOODMAN Costa Mesa
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1994 | ROBERT BARKER
The City Council this week declined to form a special district that would have required landowners to help pay for street improvements and other public services to accommodate the $1-billion Holly Seacliff development. Angry property owners claimed that the district would have unfairly forced them to pay about $10 million for public improvements that would benefit Seacliff Partners and the company's plans for nearly 4,000 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | BILL BILLITER
The builder of the Holly-Seacliff development is asking the city to create a special district that would help reimburse the company for streets and other infrastructure, a move that has angered some nearby property owners. Seacliff Partners is developing Holly-Seacliff, a 768-acre area northwest of downtown. Plans call for up to 3,780 housing units on the property. The company has a development agreement with the city that was approved by the City Council in 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the City Council's approval of the massive Holly-Seacliff development late Monday, controversy remains over a planned hilltop project in the development and will delay construction another two months. The council late Monday approved developing 569 acres of the 780-acre mixed-use development, which will include 4,410 homes, an industrial area and a shopping center. But specific plans are unresolved for Reservoir Hill, which stands at the center of the lingering feud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
Capping 10 months of often acrimonious negotiations, school district officials and representatives from the developer of the Holly-Seacliff project have formally agreed to terms for a new elementary school that will serve the massive housing development. Huntington Beach City School District trustees on Thursday night unanimously approved an agreement with Seacliff Partners to build an 8.3-acre campus. Executives for the development partnership, which includes the Huntington Beach Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
About two months after declaring a stalemate in negotiations, officials from a school district and the developer of the huge Holly-Seacliff project said Thursday that they have reached a tentative agreement on the terms of a new elementary school that will serve the community. Spokesmen for Seacliff Partners and the Huntington Beach City School District said terms of the settlement will not be finalized and released until next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991 | BILL BILLITER
The City Council is delaying action until Feb. 10 on proposals for a subdivision with up to 4,410 new homes to be built in the city's Holly-Seacliff area. The plans are under attack by the Huntington Beach City School District, which would serve families that move into the new subdivision. District officials say the developer is not providing enough money to build an adequate school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
Organizations representing as many as 1,000 homeowners surrounding Holly-Seacliff have joined forces to oppose the sprawling planned development, charging that too many homes are being proposed in certain areas. Plans for the final 569 acres of the 780-acre project, approved this week by the Planning Commission, call for up to 3,780 homes in the north-central section of the city.
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