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Hollywood Ca Development And Redevelopment

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1997 | BETTINA BOXALL and LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The area flanking Mann's Chinese Theatre would give rise to entertainment and shopping complexes under plans unveiled Thursday for two ambitious redevelopment projects considered key to Hollywood's latest efforts to regain some of its long-faded luster. Toronto-based TrizecHahn Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1996
When bulldozers finished demolishing the three abandoned buildings near Yucca Street and Las Palmas Avenue in Hollywood on Monday, only a 360-by-75-foot empty lot remained. But there are big plans for that small space. Where once stood boarded-up buildings used by young transients for shelter and partying, neighborhood residents envision a community center surrounded by recreation space.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Film Institute will hold the 10th annual AFI Los Angeles International Film Festival at Hollywood Boulevard's historic Mann's Chinese Theatre and General Cinema's Hollywood Galaxy Theaters rather than at its former Westside locations, AFI and city officials are scheduled to announce today in Hollywood. In previous years, the festival's films were screened at the Laemmle's Sunset 5 theaters and at the Laemmle's Monica Cinemas in Santa Monica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only a passing reference to Hollywood, a few choice words tucked into a long speech about Los Angeles. But Mayor Richard Riordan's pledge to bring about a "Hollywood renaissance" in his State of the City address drew praise and skepticism Thursday among those who have spent years trying to breathe life into the blighted movie capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A preliminary investigation indicates that erosion by rainwater runoff caused the floor of a North Hollywood nightclub to collapse, not nearby subway tunneling, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said Monday. "We suspect some scouring action due to the storms that we had" may have been responsible for the damage to the El Sombrero Night Club, said John Adams, deputy MTA executive officer for construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1996 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A half dozen businesses along Lankershim Boulevard filed insurance claims against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority this week, charging that subway tunneling damaged their properties, officials said Friday. The claims followed the closure Monday of El Sombrero nightclub for safety reasons after the owner complained that MTA tunneling caused cracks and sunken floors on the property. The new claims, submitted to Argonaut Insurance Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1995 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 75 people rallied at Metropolitan Transit Authority headquarters Wednesday, protesting that two years of digging and dynamiting subway tunnels in the hills above Hollywood and Studio City will endanger their homes and the environment. "This project has more to do with ego trips than passenger trips," said State Sen. Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica), a subway critic who organized the rally. The MTA is scheduled to fire up two boring machines in February to burrow twin 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1995 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of property owners in the hills above Hollywood and Studio City are pondering a dirty question these days: Just what is the earth 800 feet below their land worth? $1,000? $250,000? $5.5 million? Zip? The conundrum has provoked strenuous debate from the Santa Monica Mountains to City Hall as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority goes full-speed ahead with its plan to dig and blast twin Red Line subway tunnels from Universal City to Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Allen has high hopes for the cavernous building on Vine Street. Inside the onetime Hollywood theater he envisions a bustling mental health center where fellow counselors help needy clients overcome their troubles. But business owner Bob Goldfarb envisions an altogether different scenario in which unruly patients harass customers at nearby stores and attract riffraff to a neighborhood struggling for its economic life.
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