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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what Hollywood preservationists are calling a "classic" mistake, Coca-Cola USA has removed its flashing red and white neon sign from Hollywood Boulevard, leaving only a washed-out red billboard in the spot where its trademark had blinked for half a century. Coke executives say finances forced them to retire the sign, which was one of about 50 neon displays the soft drink company maintains around the world. The price of leasing the billboard atop the J.J.
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NEWS
February 19, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To a generation of moviegoers, the Cinerama Dome at Sunset Boulevard and Ivar Avenue in Hollywood was a Los Angeles cultural landmark, its quirky, geodesic-shaped theater a place where one could see wide-screen movies as they were meant to be seen, and a place that helped inspire filmmakers entranced by movies like Steven Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood's biggest cowboy rode off into the sunset Tuesday. Workers dismantled the 70-foot Marlboro Man on the Sunset Strip to begin phasing out tobacco billboards across Los Angeles. The billboards are now banned as part of a $206-billion agreement that cigarette makers signed to settle state lawsuits. A huge anti-smoking advertisement will take the place of the landmark cowboy billboard at the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Marmont Lane.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It begins, as these things often do at Hollywood and Vine, with an exotic dancer of indeterminate sex. Looking fetching in a short brown skirt and long, bottle-blond hair, she (he?) is sauntering west on Hollywood Boulevard when a rap trio known as Simpson County Gangsters breaks into an impromptu hip-hop chorus about "peace, politics and prison reform." "We're from Jackson, Mississippi," says Big Tilla, 26, the group's leader, "but we really like Hollywood."
NEWS
February 19, 2002 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To a generation of moviegoers, the Cinerama Dome at Sunset Boulevard and Ivar Avenue in Hollywood was a Los Angeles cultural landmark, its quirky, geodesic-shaped theater a place where one could see wide-screen movies as they were meant to be seen, and a place that helped inspire filmmakers entranced by movies like Steven Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hollywood sign has taken a cue from the Hollywood studios: It's putting people in pictures. A new security system using infrared cameras and radar-activated zoom lenses has been installed to keep vandals, tourists and college pranksters from trespassing at the famed hillside landmark. Seventeen intruders were caught last week when sophisticated surveillance equipment hidden around the landmark sign was switched on for the first time, officials said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990
Los Angeles cultural heritage officials are waging a last-ditch effort to save Hollywood's Ontra Cafeteria from the wrecking ball. On one side is the commission, which argues that the Ontra--home of Hollywood's first post office and a former cafeteria to movie stars--is a local institution. On the other side is the building's owner, Herman Properties, which says the former cafeteria is a charred eyesore that is a potentially deadly safety hazard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lights are bright, the vinyl chairs are never sticky, and the Jell-O squares on platters look like orange, red and blue jewels. Nonetheless, Schaber's Cafeteria is slowly fading. It's not the food, insists owner Michael Weinreich, 68, it's the clientele. "They keep dying," said the white-haired restaurateur looking glum. "We lost 20 or 30 this year. So many. It's terrible." Such is the fate of one of the last 1920s-style cafeterias still in business in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1993 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Wattles Mansion, the last vestige of the turn-of-the-century resort community that once dotted the Hollywood Hills, was designated a historic cultural monument by the city Wednesday. The designation helps protect the 1905 Mission Revival estate from alteration or demolition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1990 | RON SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire gutted a two-story Hollywood studio early Thursday, causing an estimated $2.6 million in damage to the 70-year-old building where the old "Steve Allen Show" was made. About 110 firefighters were called to the Late Night Studios in the 1200 block of Vine Street, where they battled flames which at one time threatened to engulf a nearby apartment house, Fire Department spokesman Pat Marek said. The fire began at 2:10 a.m. and was extinguished 90 minutes later, Marek said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Two critics weigh in on the debate over whether to move forward with a proposed new orchestra shell or to preserve the one that has become a Southland icon. * Some three decades ago, Professor Peter Schickele, the funniest man in music, made an extraordinary entrance at the Hollywood Bowl, where he was introducing his then-recent "discovery," the justly forgotten music of PDQ Bach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1999 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were no monsters, ghosts or goblins Sunday afternoon at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. But there were plenty of tombstones--monumental, well-crafted tombstones that looked like small cathedrals and capitol-like sculptures. And underneath them were the intriguing and sometimes tragic stories of the famous, powerful and rich who helped shape Tinseltown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood's biggest cowboy rode off into the sunset Tuesday. Workers dismantled the 70-foot Marlboro Man on the Sunset Strip to begin phasing out tobacco billboards across Los Angeles. The billboards are now banned as part of a $206-billion agreement that cigarette makers signed to settle state lawsuits. A huge anti-smoking advertisement will take the place of the landmark cowboy billboard at the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Marmont Lane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shade tree lovers are trying to ax a growing campaign by Hollywood civic leaders to get rid of hundreds of ficus trees they claim are uprooting the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The showdown has been budding for more than five years, since 31 curbside ficus trees were chopped down by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as part of the Hollywood Boulevard subway project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A city preservation board gave landmark protection Wednesday to the exterior of the Hollywood Cinerama Dome--a one-of-its-kind movie theater--but in a blow to film buffs, it refused to include the interior in the designation. The fight over the future of the concrete dome has in some respects turned into a quintessential Los Angeles battle. Probably in no other city in the country would so much passion and emotion be expended on efforts to keep the inside of a 35-year-old movie theater intact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Devotees extol it as a Los Angeles legend and Hollywood icon. They've written dozens of passionate letters urging the city to give it landmark protection and fiercely protested plans to gut its interior for a contemporary make-over. A 1920s movie palace? A vintage studio building? No, it is the Cinerama Dome, a concrete geodesic dome bordered by parking lots, that is stirring these emotions. Erected at a furious pace in 1963 for the opening of "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," the Sunset Boulevard movie house is at the center of a preservation battle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though they live in the shadow of one of the world's most recognizable landmarks--the Hollywood sign--the residents of Beachwood Canyon manage to maintain a peaceful lifestyle. Carloads of sightseers trek through their streets daily to catch a close-up glimpse of the towering white letters, and yet neighbors can boast of their charming town square, with its little market and friendly restaurant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cynics might dismiss the Walk of Fame along Hollywood Boulevard as a kitschy tourism stunt from a bygone era. But those 2,094 sidewalk stars retain enough symbolism that a proposal to demolish and replace 122 of them during sidewalk repairs is stirring a squabble about preserving Hollywood's history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997
The Cinerama Dome, one of Hollywood's most identifiable landmarks, will become the centerpiece of a huge trilevel entertainment and retail center that "will be a showstopper on Sunset," a Pacific Theatres vice president said Wednesday. Groundbreaking for the "Cinerama Dome Entertainment Center" is scheduled for spring 1998, with the opening planned for late 1999. The 245,000-square-foot center will sit on 5.75 acres bounded by Sunset Boulevard, Vine Street, and Ivar and De Longpre avenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood history buffs won a victory Wednesday when a Los Angeles city agency unanimously voted against a sidewalk repair plan that would replace the pink and black settings of 122 stars on the Walk of Fame. "It's true that by Eastern standards the Walk of Fame hasn't been there very long.
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