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Hollywood Forever Cemetery

NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
After RSVPing for an upcoming Band of Outsiders-hosted dinner in honor of fashion journalist, canning wunderkind and Grand Central Market consultant Kevin West, The Times' fashion critic and I decamped to the 97-year-old downtown landmark -- where we promptly ran into West himself. The author of  "Saving the Season: A Cook's Guide to Home Canning, Pickling and Preserving" (set to be published by Knopf on June 25) was tucking into a Cobb salad at the lunch counter of Valerie, a stall recently opened by the Valerie Confections folks and one of the market's newest tenants (opening for business just 11 days ago)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Mick Jagger was among those mourning the death of L'Wren Scott on Tuesday during a small funeral held at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery and attended by close friends and family only. The well-known fashion designer and stylist, who'd been with the Rolling Stones frontman since 2001, committed suicide March 17 in her New York apartment. She was 49. The Los Angeles cemetery was closed completely during the service, which ran approximately an hour and was led by the Rev. Ed Bacon of All Saints Church in Pasadena, according to a statement from Jagger's rep obtained by the Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Eccentrically innovative Los Angeles art-rock duo Sparks ( a.k.a. brothers Ron and Russell Mael) will play a hometown show April 16, bringing their new stripped-down stage show, “Two Hands, One Mouth,” to the Masonic Temple at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. The concert falls between the two weekends they'll also be playing at Coachella. Sparks last performed in L.A. in 2011, not in a traditional concert setting for a semi-staged presentation of their “film-to-be” music-theater piece “The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman” as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2011 | Mark Kellam
The owners of Hollywood Forever Cemetery say they are interested in buying Glendale's troubled Grand View Memorial Park, which fell into scandal in 2005 when investigators discovered that 4,000 people had been improperly buried. The sale of Grand View -- where public access has been limited for years since the facility fell into a state of disrepair -- is required under the terms of a $3.8-million settlement of a class-action lawsuit against the cemetery's operators. The lawsuit came in the wake of a 2005 state investigation that found the remains of 4,000 people who had not been properly buried.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2010 | By Ramie Becker, Los Angeles Times
As we move into the hottest part of the summer, the nights are long and languorous, perfect for seeing a movie. Outside. Perhaps in a cemetery, with a picnic and a live DJ. This is one of the best reasons to live in film-crazy L.A., and Angelenos have a good selection of outdoor locations and programs to choose from. From Agoura Hills to Hollywood, we've got your guide to cinema under the stars. For 10 years, Cinespia's Saturday-night screenings at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery have been the gold standard for outdoor cinema in L.A. Besides the never-gets-old novelty of picnicking next to some of Hollywood's most famous (and now dead)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Katherine Tulich
Though new blockbusters may grab all the headlines, summer movies reach new heights in the great outdoors. Why not enjoy the night sky, some fine food and tunes before relaxing with friends at the many outdoor cinema locations that have burst onto the L.A. landscape in the last few years? From nostalgic drive-ins to parties under the stars with local food trucks to a premium, Oscar-curated series, classic films and cult favorites get a replay in a whole new way. Oscars Outdoors Launched last year, this weekend screening series at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science's open-air theater on its Hollywood campus has been a sold-out success.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2005 | Geoff Boucher
Thanks to Ronald Reagan, Los Angeles will have a grand new monument to punk rock. On Friday, the fans and famous friends of the late Johnny Ramone will gather at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery to dedicate a bronze statue that depicts him clawing away at his Mosrite guitar. Who was it exactly who decided that a gritty New York rock outlaw is best memorialized atop a masonry pedestal beside a pond? That would be Ramone himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
On Monday night at the Masonic Hall within the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, about 200 people witnessed the results of what electronic musician M.C. Schmidt described as “experiments in psychic research.” As one half of the Baltimore-based duo Matmos, Schmidt relayed that his studies indicated that, among other things, after being exposed to their methodology, “a lot of people see green triangles.” Indeed, Schmidt and bandmate Drew Daniel had...
HOME & GARDEN
August 11, 2012 | By Lauren Williams
I was just months away from marrying my high school sweetheart and shipping off to the Peace Corps. I'd had a bright five-year plan that included teaching English in a faraway land. The idea of a new culture and new life filled me with the sense that all the pieces were falling into place. Except the pieces fell apart. My eight-year relationship with the man I thought I'd marry quickly soured, the dynamic changing after we moved in together. I was puzzled over how someone I thought I knew better than myself could seemingly change overnight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood Memorial Park, the final resting place of such legendary Hollywood denizens as Rudolph Valentino, Douglas Fairbanks, Cecil B. DeMille, Peter Lorre and Tyrone Power, fell into bankruptcy in the 1990s, losing its license in 1994. Families were disinterring their loved ones and moving them to operational cemeteries. Then in 1998, Tyler Cassity, a movie-star-handsome 31-year-old from Kansas City, Mo., bought the 62-acre property on Santa Monica Boulevard for $375,000.
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